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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/03/21 in Posts

  1. The National - Never Tear Us Apart
    1 point
  2. Nah haiduk is legit, I've seen them post before an I liked it
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  3. You can talk to one of the npcs at the ritual area for it again.
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  4. So im doing shadow of the storm quest. I did the incantation and wrote it down when i was at work. Cleaning crew threw it out and now its gone. Im at the end and nooooo way of progressing because the incantation is gone and i cant remember it whatsoever. Im stuck. What the hell should i do cuz i dont want to start another account
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  5. http://nalgene.com
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  6. :arrow: Da Latios (or tips on approachal in general) (Hey, I saw you around lightning's chat the other day) Approaching someone you like is always difficult at first, until you build up a trust with them. If you know anything she would like to do (shop, movies, apple picking, arcade, etc..), a great way to start building a relationship would be to invite her to hang out with you and do something she'd like. It would be best to call her instead of talking over MSN, and make sure you're suave about it (don't studder, don't sound nervous). One way to do this is to know what you have to say, think over your sentances, right them down or write down bullet points. Say something like "Hey, some freinds of mine wanna go see this movie and go somewhere afterwards, wanna come with me?". If you wanna be alone with her more, tell her only a few freinds are going, and when you're there tell her they bailed on ya. If you're going to a movie with her, pay for her ticket but if food is expensive you'll seem like you're going to far out of your way to pay for her's as well. After the movie plan an hour to hang out, talk about the movie and such, and bring coins to play at the cinema arcade(if your's has one). Or if she's fine with it, returning to your house after hanging out is a good idea, tell her she's invited to dinner at your house to make her feel more comfortable (if so, have something that's not to difficult to prepare, so it doesn't seem to showy and unnatural, pizza or speghetti is good) But whatever you do, make sure if you're going to go to see a movie, don't end the date right afterwards and go seperate ways, that leaves alot to be desired and seems like a waste of socializing time. Hope this helps, best of luck.
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  7. This is an essay I wrote for the BBC Young Writers Contest. The assignment was to write a 600 word argumentative essay on the topic 'Young people are the key to understanding multicultural values'. Note that this applies to western Europe in general and Holland in particular; I don't know how relevant this is to America/Australia/etc.. --- The establishment of multicultural values by the young, for the young. The concept of immigration, whether itÃÆââââ¬Å¡Ã¬Ã¢ââ¬Å¾Ã¢s for economical, political or religious reason, is not new. During the seventeenth and eighteenth century, there was a time when the ratio of Dutch citizens to foreigners was thirty to one. The majority of them came fleeing political and religious oppression. They consisted mostly of French protestants, Portuguese Jews and Italian scientists. Freedom of press and freedom of religion were the main reasons for them to settle here. As a whole, we were a remarkably tolerant society. However, since world war 2, there has been a new influx of immigration that seems to be received very differently indeed. For one, the amount of foreigners that came solely for economical reasons seems a lot larger. The diversity of immigrants is also much larger. They now come from all across the globe in stead of just Europe. The ratio is now five hundred to one, a mere fraction of what it once was, but for some reason it seems much harder to deal with the idea of multicultural values today than it did two centuries ago. Now, while three generations of immigrants struggle to carve out a place for themselves in society, it seems very hard to give a definition of the values that bind them and bind us. On every level, political, educational, religious or otherwise, there is a constant debate on how things should be, yet thereÃÆââââ¬Å¡Ã¬Ã¢ââ¬Å¾Ã¢s a general feeling of malaise surrounding the discussion; it just doesnÃÆââââ¬Å¡Ã¬Ã¢ââ¬Å¾Ã¢t seem to work. But is all talking really the best way to come to a consensus? Perhaps the ÃÆââââ¬Å¡Ã¬Ãâ¹ÃâexpertsÃÆââââ¬Å¡Ã¬Ã¢ââ¬Å¾Ã¢ would do best to just take a step back and observe those places where people come together and interact, especially the younger people. After all, a personÃÆââââ¬Å¡Ã¬Ã¢ââ¬Å¾Ã¢s values are mostly defined by their upbringing, and they are the one that in ten or fifteen years will be putting a new generation of children into this world. If we want to know how multiculturalism would apply to these children, learning from their future parents would provide some interesting insights. This more empirical approach to what is quickly becoming a sociological dilemma is a new way to focus on both present and future, and on how one will affect the other. Once we know what to expect, we can work together to create a social environment where all citizens can live as equal. The opportunities a young person has to develop themselves both at work and within their community are still too often dictated by ethnical background. The recent race riots in various French cities have clearly shown us the dangers of ignoring the plight of a younger generation. Multicultural values are the key to establishing a healthy society of equals, a society where each individual can live up to their full potential. We have seen the consequences of ignoring the current impoverished state of young immigrants. If we are to create a society in which our children can enjoy their childhoods in safety, we have to act now. We canÃÆââââ¬Å¡Ã¬Ã¢ââ¬Å¾Ã¢t expect things to set themselves right on their own, but we need to look and listen before we act. Young people are the key to understanding multicultural values, but all too often they get ignored in the debate, and itÃÆââââ¬Å¡Ã¬Ã¢ââ¬Å¾Ã¢s becoming more and more obvious that they will not be ignored much longer. If we want to create a society based on multicultural values we have to listen to all its members, its youngest members most of all. They carry the burden of the future with them.
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  8. Superb essay, especially for a "young" writer. As per GhostRanger's post, if you've already submitted or are just putting it out there - ignore the following ideas: Minor errors, typos etc: 1st Para: 'economic' refers to a reason to move countries rather than 'economical' which tends to refer to small cars. You've listed more than one reason... so it should properly read "economic, political or religious reasons". 2nd Para: Avoid starting sentences with "However". Try "Since World War 2 however," instead. Again, economic rather than economical. 5th Para: Another plural - "all citizens can live as equals." rather than "all citizens can live as equal." I count 589 words, so good job on getting all the ideas down under the word limit. It would be interesting to get some ideas in there about just why it is that you can take a bunch of children from widely different backgrounds and they'll happily play together as though none was any different to the other. But take the same children twenty years later and they find it hard to get along. But again... good job. I expect to read your work in the opinion section of the BBC very soon :)
    1 point
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