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Do YOU Pirate Music?

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Has anyone who has pirated music and then afterwards lived a "life of good", did you then delete your pirated music?

 

Nope, and glad I didn't. :3


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I pirate music, as well as a lot of other stuff. I justify it by buying stuff I really like. I know it isn't morally right, but looking at all the movie I have purchased blind just because I liked something else that particular director/writer/actor did that I had downloaded I don't feel bad about doing it.


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Has anyone who has pirated music and then afterwards lived a "life of good", did you then delete your pirated music?

 

I delete it if it turns out to be crap, does that count?


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Has anyone who has pirated music and then afterwards lived a "life of good", did you then delete your pirated music?

 

I delete it if it turns out to be crap, does that count?

 

I'd say no, you still "own" pirated stuff, which why I don't get why people who pirated suddenly pretend to be doing the "good" thing, when they still "own" said material from the past.

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Most music I get is actually free, and is produced by others. I usually listen to Techno music, and I get if off Newgrounds.

 

When I do listen to other stuff, I do pirate it, though I feel guilty. However, I do buy my songs occasionally because I get better quality music off iTunes.


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http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/06/18/min ... index.html

 

(CNN) -- A federal jury Thursday found a 32-year-old Minnesota woman guilty of illegally downloading music from the Internet and fined her $80,000 each -- a total of $1.9 million -- for 24 songs. Jammie Thomas-Rasset's case was the first such copyright infringement case to go to trial in the United States, her attorney said.

 

 

 

Attorney Joe Sibley said that his client was shocked at fine, noting that the price tag on the songs she downloaded was 99 cents.

 

 

 

She plans to appeal, he said.

 

 

 

Cara Duckworth, a spokeswoman for the Recording Industry Association of America, said the RIIA was "pleased that the jury agreed with the evidence and found the defendant liable."

 

 

 

"We appreciate the jury's service and that they take this as seriously as we do," she said.

 

 

 

Thomas-Rasset downloaded work by artists such as No Doubt, Linkin Park, Gloria Estefan and Sheryl Crow.

 

 

 

This was the second trial for Thomas-Rasset. The judge ordered a retrial in 2007 after there was an error in the wording of jury instructions.

 

 

 

The fines jumped considerably from the first trial, which granted just $220,000 to the recording companies.

 

 

 

Thomas-Rasset is married with four children and works for an Indian tribe in Minnesota.

 

That seems like an extreme fine for 24 songs..


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The RIAA are [bleep]ing crooks.

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I think you mean RIAA?


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Goddammit Monk, stop being so full of win.

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http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/06/18/minnesota.music.download.fine/index.html

 

(CNN) -- A federal jury Thursday found a 32-year-old Minnesota woman guilty of illegally downloading music from the Internet and fined her $80,000 each -- a total of $1.9 million -- for 24 songs. Jammie Thomas-Rasset's case was the first such copyright infringement case to go to trial in the United States, her attorney said.

 

 

 

Attorney Joe Sibley said that his client was shocked at fine, noting that the price tag on the songs she downloaded was 99 cents.

 

 

 

She plans to appeal, he said.

 

 

 

Cara Duckworth, a spokeswoman for the Recording Industry Association of America, said the RIIA was "pleased that the jury agreed with the evidence and found the defendant liable."

 

 

 

"We appreciate the jury's service and that they take this as seriously as we do," she said.

 

 

 

Thomas-Rasset downloaded work by artists such as No Doubt, Linkin Park, Gloria Estefan and Sheryl Crow.

 

 

 

This was the second trial for Thomas-Rasset. The judge ordered a retrial in 2007 after there was an error in the wording of jury instructions.

 

 

 

The fines jumped considerably from the first trial, which granted just $220,000 to the recording companies.

 

 

 

Thomas-Rasset is married with four children and works for an Indian tribe in Minnesota.

 

That seems like an extreme fine for 24 songs..

 

 

 

My brother told me about that. 1.9 million? Music companies = Greedy.

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http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/06/18/minnesota.music.download.fine/index.html

 

(CNN) -- A federal jury Thursday found a 32-year-old Minnesota woman guilty of illegally downloading music from the Internet and fined her $80,000 each -- a total of $1.9 million -- for 24 songs. Jammie Thomas-Rasset's case was the first such copyright infringement case to go to trial in the United States, her attorney said.

 

 

 

Attorney Joe Sibley said that his client was shocked at fine, noting that the price tag on the songs she downloaded was 99 cents.

 

 

 

She plans to appeal, he said.

 

 

 

Cara Duckworth, a spokeswoman for the Recording Industry Association of America, said the RIIA was "pleased that the jury agreed with the evidence and found the defendant liable."

 

 

 

"We appreciate the jury's service and that they take this as seriously as we do," she said.

 

 

 

Thomas-Rasset downloaded work by artists such as No Doubt, Linkin Park, Gloria Estefan and Sheryl Crow.

 

 

 

This was the second trial for Thomas-Rasset. The judge ordered a retrial in 2007 after there was an error in the wording of jury instructions.

 

 

 

The fines jumped considerably from the first trial, which granted just $220,000 to the recording companies.

 

 

 

Thomas-Rasset is married with four children and works for an Indian tribe in Minnesota.

 

That seems like an extreme fine for 24 songs..

 

 

 

My brother told me about that. 1.9 million? Music companies = Greedy.

 

$1.92M American dollars? Soon that will only be like 50 Euros anyway.

 

 

 

All jokes aside, I don't see how they can justify that fine for her, that in AUD ($2.4M) is 48 years pay at the average wage of $50,000AU is enough till you retire. :|


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Nine naked men is a technological achievement. Quote of 2013.

 

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I think you mean RIAA?

 

 

 

See I thought that, but the article said RIIA, hah.

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That is some [cabbage].

 

:wall:

 

I thought the RIAA stopped going after downloaders.


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People be jealous of my waffles and what.cd access. :D
I find what.cd pretty useless unless you actually have stuff to upload, which I don't. I've had torrents sitting without seeding in my client for months now.

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I stream movies and tv shows online. I also use itunes for music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I only d/l music if it isnt on itunes (i buy the album if it sounds good as a whole)

 

 

 

I d/l movies if i cant find a stream. they are usually independent or underground films.


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Spotify > downloading music


'Tis I, 'tis Vindice, 'tis I!

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Spotify > downloading music

 

 

 

Oh yes, every country has access to Spotify.


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I don't download illegally, but I've thought about it. There's simply too much music that I want, but I can't afford to buy it legally. But I don't trust Limewire, Kazaa, etc.

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Spotify > downloading music

 

 

 

Oh yes, every country has access to Spotify.

 

They do with proxies. :thumbup:


 

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I don't download illegally, but I've thought about it. There's simply too much music that I want, but I can't afford to buy it legally. But I don't trust Limewire, Kazaa, etc.

 

Torrents?


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WONGTONG IS THE BEST AND IS MORE SUPERIOR THAN ME

#1 Wongtong stalker.

Im looking for some No Limit soldiers!

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Spotify > downloading music

 

 

 

Oh yes, every country has access to Spotify.

 

They do with proxies. :thumbup:

 

<3 Proxies. I get a warm fuzzy feeling when I use them.

 

 

 

I don't download illegally, but I've thought about it. There's simply too much music that I want, but I can't afford to buy it legally. But I don't trust Limewire, Kazaa, etc.

 

Torrents?

 

If you're smart Torrents are safer then buying a CD, with the CD you may get a rootkit....


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Nine naked men is a technological achievement. Quote of 2013.

 

PCGamingWiki - Let's fix PC gaming!

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Spotify > downloading music

 

 

 

Oh yes, every country has access to Spotify.

 

They do with proxies. :thumbup:

 

 

 

If I'm going to be bending rules may as well just download. :lol:

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Spotify > downloading music

 

 

 

Oh yes, every country has access to Spotify.

 

They do with proxies. :thumbup:

 

 

 

If I'm going to be bending rules may as well just download. :lol:

 

Ehh stopped working yesterday for me after about two weeks. Said my location didn't match my profile. I just made another account. #-o


 

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The record companies have only themselves to blame?

 

 

 

So who killed the record industry as we knew it? "The record companies have created this situation themselves," says Simon Wright, CEO of Virgin Entertainment Group, which operates Virgin Megastores.

 

 

 

While there are factors outside of the labels' control -- from the rise of the Internet to the popularity of video games and DVDs -- many in the industry see the last seven years as a series of botched opportunities. And among the biggest, they say, was the labels' failure to address online piracy at the beginning by making peace with the first file-sharing service, Napster. "They left billions and billions of dollars on the table by suing Napster -- that was the moment that the labels killed themselves," says Jeff Kwatinetz, CEO of management company the Firm. "The record business had an unbelievable opportunity there.

 

 

 

They were all using the same service. It was as if everybody was listening to the same radio station. Then Napster shut down, and all those 30 or 40 million people went to other [file-sharing services]."

 

 

 

http://www.rollingstone.com/news/story/ ... ys_decline

 

 

 

Interesting way to look at it. I wonder how long till CDs become useless and all becomes digital. For those worry about quality, there's FLAC.

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