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Things that annoy the HELL out of you.


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Last time I mixed plastic and scissors it was not pretty though...and hey the jug is roughly a rectangular prism anyway.  I don't know, maybe.  The ones I have are even closer than the picture I found here.

 

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"Fight for what you believe in, and believe in what you're fighting for." Can games be art?

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My blog here if you want to check out my Times articles and other writings! I always appreciate comments/feedback.

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Cars stop well over the crosswalk, and then proceed to wave me through to go ahead and cross.  I wouldn't mind if they just went straight through - it's not like there's a line of twenty cars behind them most times.  I usually walk behind them instead to subtly make my point.

"Fight for what you believe in, and believe in what you're fighting for." Can games be art?

---

 

 

cWCZMZO.png

l1M6sfb.png

My blog here if you want to check out my Times articles and other writings! I always appreciate comments/feedback.

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Someone is making a racket out there with a leafblower. They did it for hours on Saturday, and now today. I mean come on man, if you were going to clean up the leaves why not do it earlier in the season anyway?

"Fight for what you believe in, and believe in what you're fighting for." Can games be art?

---

 

 

cWCZMZO.png

l1M6sfb.png

My blog here if you want to check out my Times articles and other writings! I always appreciate comments/feedback.

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SJWs. I don't like being called the enemy or being expected to apologize for something I didn't do.

Similarly, I dislike being completely discredited because I happen to care about the kind of people that really only exist as a punchline. In the interest of not causing a shitstorm, can I concede that both sides need better people?  :-P

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I have a hard time taking anyone who uses the term "SJWs" seriously. Now it's basically just a pejorative term used to generalize anyone who shows sympathy for minorities. Subreddits like r/tumblrinaction are poisonous circlejerks that point to a few dumb posts by impressionable teenagers, shout "SJW! SJW!" then expand the term to anyone who speaks out for things like feminism or racial equality. 

 

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Well, you 'muricans would be nothing without your military.

That is my honest opinion.

Everywhere else China rules the world right now.

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So I've noticed this thread's regulars all follow similar trends.

 

RPG is constantly dealing with psycho exes.

Muggi reminds us of the joys of polygamy.

Saq is totally oblivious to how much chicks dig him.

I strike out every other week.

Kalphite wages a war against the friend zone.

Randox pretty much stays rational.

Etc, etc

 

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Well, you 'muricans would be nothing without your military.

That is my honest opinion.

Everywhere else China rules the world right now.

ok

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Three months banishment to 9gag is something i would never wish upon anybody, not even my worst enemy.

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Both feminists and MRAs would both be a lot happier and more successful if they understood that when life throws a challenge at you, adapting to the challenge is a lot more effective than complaining about the challenge and refusing to adapt

This is why I don't follow politics. I've never met someone who became a happier and more successful person as a result of getting emotionally invested in "issues."

If something isn't affecting you personally in your day to day life, don't worry about it. If something is affecting you in your day to day life, figure out how to adapt in the simplest way possible.

 

One of my favorite quotes:
"You'd best change your point of view. Stop blaming me, thinking I'm the problem. If you think I'm the problem, then you have to change me. If you realize that you're the problem, then you can change yourself, learn something and grow wiser. Most people want everyone else in the world to change but themselves. Let me tell you, it's easier to change yourself than everyone else."

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SJWs. I don't like being called the enemy or being expected to apologize for something I didn't do.

Similarly, I dislike being completely discredited because I happen to care about the kind of people that really only exist as a punchline. In the interest of not causing a shitstorm, can I concede that both sides need better people?  :-P

 

 

Yeah your going to get terrible people in any group. 

 

As far as SJWs go. I bet you find the "white privilege" punchline that flys around facebook a bit patronizing and beside the point. And largely it is, it comes off as a poo ball that gets thrown at people who really don't have much influence in the political or corporate world, ie: people youre friends with on facebook. You get really bad loaded terms because all this is grass roots and it is how people feel about the situation.

 

This privilege thing is pretty much the problem I have with them. As for the rest of the causes, I pretty much tried to steer clear of politics and other such debates simply because I see the whole thing as unnecessary stress that's going to resolve itself one way or the other without my input anyway. The place where I have a personal problem with SJWs is pretty much where Ring World said: how being a white male is pretty much their equivalent of original sin. Another problem is how calling them out on it generally leads to the accusation that I hate them because I don't care about equality, when really it's because I don't like being called guilty of something I never did.

 

In my day to day life, I don't treat people better or worse depending on race or sex or whatever. As far as I'm concerned, as long as that's true, I am not part of the problem, and I'd appreciate people not saying I am.

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Get back here so I can rub your butt.

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SJWs. I don't like being called the enemy or being expected to apologize for something I didn't do.

Similarly, I dislike being completely discredited because I happen to care about the kind of people that really only exist as a punchline. In the interest of not causing a shitstorm, can I concede that both sides need better people?  :-P

 

 

Yeah your going to get terrible people in any group. 

 

As far as SJWs go. I bet you find the "white privilege" punchline that flys around facebook a bit patronizing and beside the point. And largely it is, it comes off as a poo ball that gets thrown at people who really don't have much influence in the political or corporate world, ie: people youre friends with on facebook. You get really bad loaded terms because all this is grass roots and it is how people feel about the situation.

 

This privilege thing is pretty much the problem I have with them. As for the rest of the causes, I pretty much tried to steer clear of politics and other such debates simply because I see the whole thing as unnecessary stress that's going to resolve itself one way or the other without my input anyway. The place where I have a personal problem with SJWs is pretty much where Ring World said: how being a white male is pretty much their equivalent of original sin. Another problem is how calling them out on it generally leads to the accusation that I hate them because I don't care about equality, when really it's because I don't like being called guilty of something I never did.

 

 

I just "unfollow" (I don't unfriend) all of my outspoken political friends on FB so I don't have to read their articles and rants on my newsfeed. I also no longer have to be tempted to poke holes in their logic. I've been so much happier ever since.

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Hm? How exactly would you adapt to that sort of thing? Just from my own experiences, there's really not much you can do when a strongly ingrained social issue slaps an opportunity out of your hands.

 

 

Give me a specific example and I'll tell you what I'd do

The topical one is being a racial minority and being denied fair treatment and representation in law enforcement, which could also tie back in to the fact that poverty is one big positive feedback cycle, which is another thing in itself.

The one that seems to be relevant to a couple of OTers is being a sexual minority and essentially having to choose between your family or your identity.

 

I'm not the best at examples, and it's not helping that I can't easily get statistics and quotes and the like from here.

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You're still being pretty vague >_>

 

If I was 18, poor, and had zero work experience I'd find a job in entry level 100% commission sales. There's several companies in every major US city that will hire ANYONE (including homeless people!) because it's entry level and 100% commission. Then I'd save that money up while I come up with my long-term career goal, and eventually change jobs accordingly. Alternatively, I'd spend as much time as possible in a library devouring every book on business, entrepreneurship, wealth, etc. that I could get my hands on and build my own business.

 

If my family no longer accepted and supported me, I'd minimize my time spent with them. If I didn't already, I'd find my own place to live in (and maybe find a roommate to cut costs). A 100% commission sales job would easily fund a decent apartment in a decent location.

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@muggi and Ring, you're both making gross oversimplifications that are essentially the "just pull yourself up by your bootstraps" myth. The idea that racial minorities and people living in poverty can just go ahead and start working towards leading a successful life is a nice idea that completely ignores the reality of most people's situations. I volunteer at what's widely regarded as the most ethnically diverse high school in the country, where about 80% of the students receive free lunch from the government due to the fact that they're below a certain income level. I primarily work with them to help them achieve post-secondary goals, be that a university, community college, technical school, or whatever else. This includes educating them about financial aid, scholarships, proofreading essays, etc.

 

The point of me bringing this up is that these kids lead significantly more difficult lives than you or I, and making claims that they should just go ahead and start working harder/smarter to ultimately achieve equality is about as useful as telling the president to "work harder" to fix the economy. One of the students I work with, who's a girl who moved to the US from the Philippines a few years ago, has just one living parent who's disabled and can't work a job, is attending community college and high school at the same while working part time and playing a sport, has no source of transportation other than the school bus, and is relying on government assistance to do pretty much everything from eating to paying for school stuff. She works harder than I ever have in my life, and is getting better grades than I did in high school. But she herself has told me that she'd have no idea what she'd be planning post-high school if it wasn't for the help of the program I work with. But these sorts of programs are rare, and many students like my mentee can't make use of them because of family issues, needing to work after school to make money for their family, etc. While these problems aren't unique to minorities, they're much more prevalent due to the feedback loop of systemic racism and economic inequality that Alg alluded to earlier.

 

Your posts themselves make great examples of the essence of the idea of privilege. You have the privilege to assume that these kids have the information to know about those kinds of opportunities (such as working a sales job, knowing that going into the military is a good segue to being a police officer). You have the privilege to assume that these kids have the ability to get reliable transportation that would make these opportunities possible. You have the privilege to assume that, while they're an ethnic minority from a low socioeconomic background, they would be fairly considered for positions that they ultimately seek out. 

 

It's easy to make those kinds of assumptions as a white heterosexual middle-class male (all of which are categories I belong to), but they're based purely on the experience that we have living lives that are fundamentally different than those experienced by minorities. While there are opportunities to succeed in America for minorities, the ingrained, systemic inequalities that have been perpetuated for centuries make things far from the equal playing field that many see the country as being today.

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You managed to miss the main point of my post then. Nowhere am I saying that it's impossible to succeed as a minority or as someone in poverty. Nowhere am I saying that hard work isn't something valuable that anyone could achieve a lot of benefits from. Your family members, as well as countless others have shown that it's very possible to succeed under adverse circumstances. You're kind of inadvertently supporting exactly what I'm saying by showing how hard so many minorities in the US have to work to become successful. Like you said yourself about your own family, they had to take a lot of extra steps and go through a lot of effort to get to where they were. But all that necessary effort isn't shared by the majority of white people in the United States. Why do you think it is that, for example, Hispanic people in the US are so disproportionately represented amongst the rich in the U.S. when compared with white people? If you're asking me at least, it's due to past and present racial separation, oppression, and perpetuation of racial roles. And again, OF COURSE it is still possible to move past these barriers and work hard enough to be successful. But the role of social justice is to help dismantle those barriers and create a level playing field. 

 

Take the metaphor of a short one mile foot race. One of the athletes has gotten a head start while the other racers have to stand at the starting line, waiting 30 seconds until they're allowed to start running. Is it possible for these racers to be equal with, or surpass the first runner before getting to the finish line? Sure. Through hard work, training, and determination, they could have a realistic shot at doing just as well or better. But why is all that extra effort necessary? Why should that one runner get that unfair advantage? To me, the idea of social equality is to remove that kind of advantage so that everyone has an equal playing field.

 

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Figuring out how to level the playing field of racial and socioeconomic inequality is one of America's biggest present challenges, and it's not something I have all the answers to, nor does anyone else yet really. But increased financial aid for post-secondary education for minorities, certain types of affirmative action policies, and in-school programs like the I one I work with that work with diverse, low income schools to supply information on job skills and scholarships for them for college is a good start. These help to give a social and economic boost to certain demographics that might not otherwise get that helpful extra leverage. And with those policies, the hope is to normalize diversity in traditionally white-dominated areas and ultimately level the playing field. 

 

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You managed to miss the main point of my post then. Nowhere am I saying that it's impossible to succeed as a minority or as someone in poverty. Nowhere am I saying that hard work isn't something valuable that anyone could achieve a lot of benefits from. Your family members, as well as countless others have shown that it's very possible to succeed under adverse circumstances. You're kind of inadvertently supporting exactly what I'm saying by showing how hard so many minorities in the US have to work to become successful. Like you said yourself about your own family, they had to take a lot of extra steps and go through a lot of effort to get to where they were.

That's exactly my point. It's completely possible for them to be successful. They just have to put in more effort than a "privileged" person would. Is that fair? No. But if you choose to do nothing, and instead just choose to whine about how unfair it is, you're never going to be successful.

 

And that's the thing: nobody's perfect. Nobody's privileged in every aspect of life. I could be considered privileged from a financial/educational standpoint, but I'm nowhere near privileged when it comes to my health and my dating life. I could've easily just whined about my shitty genetics and tried to get the world to treat me differently because of my physique, but I decided I'd be better off just putting in lots and lots of hard work in order to get to the level of fitness that so many people have naturally. And I could easily whine about how unfair it is that women didn't like me without having to do a major overhaul of my social skills and personality quirks.

 

But all that necessary effort isn't shared by the majority of white people in the United States. Why do you think it is that, for example, Hispanic people in the US are so disproportionately represented amongst the rich in the U.S. when compared with white people? If you're asking me at least, it's due to past and present racial separation, oppression, and perpetuation of racial roles. And again, OF COURSE it is still possible to move past these barriers and work hard enough to be successful. But the role of social justice is to help dismantle those barriers and create a level playing field.

We'll have to disagree with the role of social justice here. IME a lot of people believe that it's IMPOSSIBLE for disadvantaged people to become successful. They don't believe that with enough hard work and determination, they can achieve the same level of success as a privileged person. Allowing people to believe that no matter how hard they work, they'll never be successful isn't helping anyone.

 

Take the metaphor of a short one mile foot race. One of the athletes has gotten a head start while the other racers have to stand at the starting line, waiting 30 seconds until they're allowed to start running. Is it possible for these racers to be equal with, or surpass the first runner before getting to the finish line? Sure. Through hard work, training, and determination, they could have a realistic shot at doing just as well or better. But why is all that extra effort necessary? Why should that one runner get that unfair advantage? To me, the idea of social equality is to remove that kind of advantage so that everyone has an equal playing field.

 

When you start operating from the perspective of how the world "should" be, rather than how the world actually is, you're getting into dangerous territory. Many of my friends are well into their 20s now and they're depressed and unsuccessful because they refuse to change their habits and behaviors. Why? Because they don't think that they should have to. They think the world should change for them. After all, that's what's "fair."

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