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It's got nothing to do with insecurity. It's about standards. Our client wanted english, not gibbering and slang. So do most other companies we do business with. If the American is unable to adjust to proper English, if he's adamant on using his slang, then clearly he should seek employment elsewhere. Somewhere where it's acceptable to sound like a 5-year old. And to be honest, i can't classify "should of" or "most everything" as colloquialisms. "Cuppa" or "Barbie" are examples of slang and/or colloquialisms. "Should of" or "most everything" are examples of either poor education, or laziness. Neither of which are well suited for a senior position. 

 

I find it disturbing that i have to defend proper English.

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I'm no advertising professional and I can understand your frustration, but if your client is going to walk away allegedly because of a couple spelling mistakes (or shall we say, pet peeve phrases), maybe it's because the product was marginal or they were looking for an excuse to turn it down anyway. It's not like he wrote "So do u liek r designz??" is it?

Apparently it's not the first time he's made mistakes like that. The client actually asked our superior if it would be possible for someone else to handle the correspondence because he (our client) was getting frustrated with having to read e-mails filled with spelling and grammatical errors. When my boss was approached about this, he used the excuse that "what does spelling and grammar matter, as long as they're getting the message".

That's the problem with a lot of westerners here. They think they're untouchable in the workplace. 

 

Hmm okay, guess that's a fair point, and he deserved what he got then.

 

 
 

Maybe that has to do with you being in a country where English is a second language and there is an up-tightness surrounding it because you can't take for granted that everyone there knows how to speak it.

 

 

Anyways colloquial terms are valid and in English speaking countries politicians and businesses intentionally use them to connect to local populations.

I think this is ridiculous to be honest. Your politicians might as well be saying "We're okay with you being under-educated" 

Of course they want an undereducated populace (at least, a decent fraction of them do). Do you think they would get away with half the stunts they pulled in Congress if people understood and voted out that sort of behavior? Plus these days it's only politically correct to make everyone feel awesome and special, and pander to every little group in the process.

"Fight for what you believe in, and believe in what you're fighting for." Can games be art?

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It would be interesting to see what counts as proper English in America versus Britain. E.g. in America it's common to say "write me" but in the UK (and Australia and other Anglophone countries, I think) that's a grammatical nonsense - you have to put "to" in the middle of the phrase. Although it could be that "write me" doesn't pass for proper English in America and is merely used a lot. 

 

Also, I've lost track of who is American, who is an Arab, where this advertising company is based, and what's going on any more. 

 

PS. As for politicians trying to be colloquial to reach people, watch Labour Party leader Ed Miliband trying to say "hell yeah." Not only was it hilarious, it's also slang from the wrong country. Not many British people say hell yeah. It would be like Hilary Clinton trying to connect to people using cockney rhyming slang. 


"Imagine yourself surrounded by the most horrible cripples and maniacs it is possible to conceive, and you may understand a little of my feelings with these grotesque caricatures of humanity about me."

- H.G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau

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So in the UK, even saying something like "write me a letter" or "write me up a list of stuff you need" is considered a grammatical fallacy as well? Or just when the phrase is used by itself?

"Fight for what you believe in, and believe in what you're fighting for." Can games be art?

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My blog here if you want to check out my Times articles and other writings! I always appreciate comments/feedback.

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It would be interesting to see what counts as proper English in America versus Britain. E.g. in America it's common to say "write me" but in the UK (and Australia and other Anglophone countries, I think) that's a grammatical nonsense - you have to put "to" in the middle of the phrase. Although it could be that "write me" doesn't pass for proper English in America and is merely used a lot.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/UsefulNotes/SeparatedByACommonLanguage

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/StockAmericanPhrases

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/StockBritishPhrases

 

A highly casual overview of some differences. The American half is pretty okay, can't vouch for the rest of the world's (obviously). It's mostly focused on colloquialisms and casual speech, if that's what you're looking for.

 

Cultural differences are pretty interesting, though the posturing that tends to come with them annoys the hell out of me.

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So in the UK, even saying something like "write me a letter" or "write me up a list of stuff you need" is considered a grammatical fallacy as well? Or just when the phrase is used by itself?

 

Those are grammatically sound, it's when the preposition "to" is dropped that it becomes ungrammatical. As for those two examples, they are also not conventional in British English:

 

"Write me a letter" would usually be said as "write to me." Or if you want the letter for a specific purpose, "put it in writing."

 

"Write me up a list..." would be "Write a list..." or simply "write it down." In Britain, the phrasal verb "to write up" is associated with e.g. writing up the results of a scientific experiment and other formal/professional functions. Anything casual is "write down" 99% of the time, so a shopping list would be written down, not up. 

 

@ Alg: a lot of it is posturing. I tend to notice these things more because, English not being my 1st language, I think I naturally pay more attention to how things are said. The link of British-isms is a mixture of the accurate and nonsense cliché. 


"Imagine yourself surrounded by the most horrible cripples and maniacs it is possible to conceive, and you may understand a little of my feelings with these grotesque caricatures of humanity about me."

- H.G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau

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@ Alg: a lot of it is posturing. I tend to notice these things more because, English not being my 1st language, I think I naturally pay more attention to how things are said. The link of British-isms is a mixture of the accurate and nonsense cliché.

The American one is much the same, a lot of it is because the site's focus is fiction and the clichés themselves are... well, cliché. Writers who should know better still use them even if nobody talks like that anymore, and native speakers tend to take their complete lack of meaning for granted.

 

I really should look for a better source. Have been thinking about those sorts of cultural differences far too often lately. not at all out of awareness of my own changing speech patterns

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I don't think 'Hey' is considered rude anymore, is it? I feel as if even a boss or a supervisor (save maybe some work environments) would be fine with it. I probably wouldn't use it right off but it seems to be an acceptable greeting especially in passing. Also sure can be very different things - at least many people around me use it as a free substitute for 'yes,' and other times it's used as a more hesitant expression of agreement. But usually vocal tone has more to do with it than the actual choice of words.

"Fight for what you believe in, and believe in what you're fighting for." Can games be art?

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It really depends on how you want to come off. For example, if you wanted to ask your professor a quick question, you'd use hey, i.e.

 

 

Hey,

 

I was wondering if chapter 8 would be on the statistics final.

 

Thanks,

 

Meredith Palmer

 

It gives your reader the impression that they don't necessarily need a well-thought-out response. Here, the professor is just expected to say "yes" or "no", so there's no need for a fancy introduction. The same goes for when you're just giving someone a heads up. If "Thanks for letting me know, I'll keep it in mind" is something you might expect in response, then "hey" is fine.

 

Anything requiring a little more thought should address the reader directly.

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Oh I was referring to spoken English. I'd never write that in an email personally :P.

"Fight for what you believe in, and believe in what you're fighting for." Can games be art?

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My blog here if you want to check out my Times articles and other writings! I always appreciate comments/feedback.

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I have a bald spot in my beard right beneath my chin. It is about the size of a fingernail, or even a bit smaller, but god damn, it is annoying. I have a pretty awesome beard otherwise.

t3aGt.png

 

So I've noticed this thread's regulars all follow similar trends.

 

RPG is constantly dealing with psycho exes.

Muggi reminds us of the joys of polygamy.

Saq is totally oblivious to how much chicks dig him.

I strike out every other week.

Kalphite wages a war against the friend zone.

Randox pretty much stays rational.

Etc, etc

 

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To be honest, as someone who kind of straddles the line between being a native English speaker and having it as a second language, I feel it's completely justified to see things like "should of" as unprofessional. If I'm writing an email to someone important about something important and I get a mail back with grammar mistakes like that, I immediately lose a bit of trust in whoever I'm writing to. There's something similar to it in Dutch, where there might sometimes be confusion with the conjugation of certain verbs, causing a semi-common mistake to pop up. If you make a mistake like that on an essay, you'd be lucky if the professor would finish reading it. It's just a matter of education, and effort: the rule is pretty simple and universal in its application, so making a mistake on it usually shows a certain amount of apathy in your writing, something you just don't want to be showing when you're writing something important. 

 

And now completely random, but is Alg female? Have I been lied to through the medium of username for all this time? 

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And now completely random, but is Alg female? Have I been lied to through the medium of username for all this time?

Iirc it's not as cut and dry as male/female. I think Alg has elaborated on here before. Not 100% sure though

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And now completely random, but is Alg female? Have I been lied to through the medium of username for all this time?

Iirc it's not as cut and dry as male/female. I think Alg has elaborated on here before. Not 100% sure though

 

This one? Because if it's the "not as cut and dry" bit, that's the understatement of the year and I could definitely elaborate on the details of that if it's needed

 

on an entirely unrelated note, it's taken me seven years but I've finally tied Assume Nothing for top posts on this thread

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hi every1 im Soulja Boy!!!!!!! holds up mic~ my name is Mr.Boy but u can call me t3h [email protected] oF d00m!!!!!!!! lol…as u can see im very random!!!! thats why i came here, 2 meet random ppl like me _… im 15 years old (im mature 4 my age tho!!) i like 2 watch hentai w/ my bf Wale (im bi if u dont like it deal w/it) its lowkey our favorite!!! bcuz its SOOOO hood!!!! hes random 2 of course but i want 2 meet more random ppl =) like they say the more trill the merrier!!!! lol…neways i hope 2 make alot of fans here so give me lots of commentses!!!! SOULJA BOY TELL EM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! <--- me bein random again _^ hehe…deUc3S!!!!!

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The crossing guard I pass after work every day sucks. He holds his sign diagonal to the intersection so that its not really directing any particular direction to stop amd he keeps his other hand in his pocket. I annoy the HELL out of him when I completely ignore whatever he is pretending he's doing and go when everyone else stops and tries to guess who's turn it is. Hint: its mine.

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The crossing guard I pass after work every day sucks. He holds his sign diagonal to the intersection so that its not really directing any particular direction to stop amd he keeps his other hand in his pocket. I annoy the HELL out of him when I completely ignore whatever he is pretending he's doing and go when everyone else stops and tries to guess who's turn it is. Hint: its mine.

 

On a related note, people that don't stop fully/properly before waving you on across the street as a pedestrian. Yes I appreciate the courtesy, but if your foot slips off the brake and you hit me while I'm crossing, I may not be able to walk again, so please be sure you're stopping before you wave me across! I don't mind waiting another 30 seconds either, if you're in a hurry...

"Fight for what you believe in, and believe in what you're fighting for." Can games be art?

---

 

 

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l1M6sfb.png

My blog here if you want to check out my Times articles and other writings! I always appreciate comments/feedback.

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