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I might see if I can get a copy of Agent 007 Under Fire. You can use it to mod your PS2 really easily, and it is probably the cheapest method. Although I have a feeling that if I go to Gamestop and ask them for that particular game, they might get suspicious.

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Armorare requested a rant about education. Sure, here it is. Sorry that it's not great writing. I didn't really have time to organize an essay, so this is really just a flow of unprocessed ideas.

 

My main issue of the American education system is that, in this day and age, it is an obsolete system that caters to beliefs that are now far outdated. The current system, more or less, is largely the same as it was when it was first conceived. Granted, there are differences such as teacher's unions, standardized testing, and various programs, but the blueprint of it has not been revamped significantly.

 

The system, then, is based off ideas dating back to the Enlightenment and caters to an economic atmosphere of the Industrial Revolution. When it was first designed, it was revolutionary. It was theory put into practice. Never before have the people of a nation been given such an equal social endowment before in history. It's no coincidence that this period saw America's greatest growth.

 

This, however, is a mechanic that had aged. The revolutionary ideas: every child should be given an equal opportunity in life, are no longer so revolutionary. Some might argue that it is no longer even feasible. The economic situation has also changed. No longer is America developing into a powerhouse. Today, in the midst of globalization and radical competition between nations across the globe, education should prepare students for more than working in a factory.

 

You might say, "no, schools aren't expecting students to all work in factories after graduation", and that's true. But how the system is designed, that's still how kids are prepared. Deadlines, obedience, discipline, promptness, even the way students are grouped, by age, all reflect the old Industrial Revolution. Surely, today, these are still important. But do they prepare students for a globally competitive environment? Does obeying superiors and doing as they say without question foster the intellectual curiosity and divergent thinking we expect from our nation's greatest political, economic, and social leaders?

 

Too many teachers, furthermore, follow this system without question. English teachers teaching basic classes in high schools are notorious for telling students "formulas" for writing, as a way to make sure they can at least do the bare minimum and hedging a bet that that's all they will need. "You need a TAG statement in your introduction." "Your thesis may not be the first sentence." "The first sentence should go something like 'In literature, race has often been an issue that is discussed'." In higher level work, none of these rules are strictly followed, and in fact they are almost always broken. If every professional writer started his essay by saying "according to Steinbeck's novel, of Mice and Men, blah blah blah"? How many writers use the same boring, monotone sentences each time? An when writing about the same subject, no writer begins the same way as another. The fact is, apart from grammar and vocabulary, in regular High School English classes, you rarely learn anything worthwhile about writing. True, in higher level English classes on the AP and maybe even the Honors level in some districts, as well as in higher education, you learn proper writing, but how many students take that path of education? If such styles are not taught on the most elementary levels, then the school has failed to teach them. We, as Americans, should find it revolting that students with in inability to write properly are being thrown into a world where writing and communication is everything; absolutely crucial. How are they expecting to perform on the caliber of foreign students, who consistently prove that they are better than Americans at writing?

 

Furthermore, the goal of education needs to be relooked. It's based off a commendable idea, yes. An equal social endowment for all citizens is indeed an honorable cause. But clearly, it is a lost one. Not only are students from different areas of the country performing differently, students from different socioeconomic backgrounds also perform differently (on standardized tests). I am not saying that we should give up on education the masses, but clearly we should abandon the idea that at the end of 12 years, assuming kids even get 12 years, each individual will have received the same education. Because that's not true. We are kidding ourselves.

 

Instead education should refocus on the individual. The child himself. We give each child a letter grade, but what really does that letter mean? Who is that child being compared to? The "perfect" student? Perfect says who? Yes, the grades are based off simple answers that are either right or wrong, but since when has it been American to accept just one idea as right? During the Industrial Revolution, perhaps such a state of affairs was acceptable. But in today's global economy, divergent thinking should be the pride of our generation. The ability to problem solve and conceptualize is an extremely important trait. Being able to only perform programmed tasks, such as choose the one right answer, only turns men into machines. And sooner or later, these men's jobs will be replaced by actual machines. And why not? It serves us right, if we are not looking out for our children's education. At least there is someone out there thinking of a better mousetrap. Socially speaking, people are almost always grouped into two groups: Academic and Non-Academic. Smart and stupid. Intelligent and dumb. The smarts get the good grades, go to college, and become successful. The dumbs do not. But are the dumbs really destined to be "inferior"? Do the academic people manage the factory, while the non-academics work in it? No this is an outdated model. Success is not to be divided into two categories. School results should not be placing students into these two categories. It's saying that the only valuable thing about a student is his ability to say what others want to hear; what is "correct". Is that the type of leader we want in the highest echelon of our society? There is so much more to a person, and our current system utterly fails at identifying it.

 

Capitalism has also known the power of the "Invisible Hand", that force that pushes us to become bigger, smarter, and more efficient. It has affected nearly every business, yet education remains an outpost. Education has not been revolutionalized for our modern era. We have not created a more efficient and more competitive workforce. We have been producing the same workforce that was served us in the past, under the misconceived assumption that it will continue to serve us for years to come. Soon, China will become the world's biggest economy. Students in Europe and Asia consistently show they are better than Americans. It's think to rethink the type of workforce we want to produce. In today's global economy, we must increase our standards. We cannot simple give each child a basic education. We must give each child a stellar education, and not just the same one for each student. Education needs to target students. Throw aside the idea that each student will be given the same endowment. Instead, why not give each student a specialized endowment?

 

American education today is not bad, it's misguided. It is preparing students for a era that has long passed. This is evident from every facet of the classroom. The concept here is simple: we must change the education system to prepare students for the reality of the world today, a swirling, global atmosphere that values divergent thinking, creativity, collaboration, and competitiveness on top of the age-old rites of hard-work, discipline, and intelligence.

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Armorare requested a rant about education. Sure, here it is. Sorry that it's not great writing. I didn't really have time to organize an essay, so this is really just a flow of unprocessed ideas.

 

My main issue of the American education system is that, in this day and age, it is an obsolete system that caters to beliefs that are now far outdated. The current system, more or less, is largely the same as it was when it was first conceived. Granted, there are differences such as teacher's unions, standardized testing, and various programs, but the blueprint of it has not been revamped significantly.

 

The system, then, is based off ideas dating back to the Enlightenment and caters to an economic atmosphere of the Industrial Revolution. When it was first designed, it was revolutionary. It was theory put into practice. Never before have the people of a nation been given such an equal social endowment before in history. It's no coincidence that this period saw America's greatest growth.

 

This, however, is a mechanic that had aged. The revolutionary ideas: every child should be given an equal opportunity in life, are no longer so revolutionary. Some might argue that it is no longer even feasible. The economic situation has also changed. No longer is America developing into a powerhouse. Today, in the midst of globalization and radical competition between nations across the globe, education should prepare students for more than working in a factory.

 

You might say, "no, schools aren't expecting students to all work in factories after graduation", and that's true. But how the system is designed, that's still how kids are prepared. Deadlines, obedience, discipline, promptness, even the way students are grouped, by age, all reflect the old Industrial Revolution. Surely, today, these are still important. But do they prepare students for a globally competitive environment? Does obeying superiors and doing as they say without question foster the intellectual curiosity and divergent thinking we expect from our nation's greatest political, economic, and social leaders?

 

Too many teachers, furthermore, follow this system without question. English teachers teaching basic classes in high schools are notorious for telling students "formulas" for writing, as a way to make sure they can at least do the bare minimum and hedging a bet that that's all they will need. "You need a TAG statement in your introduction." "Your thesis may not be the first sentence." "The first sentence should go something like 'In literature, race has often been an issue that is discussed'." In higher level work, none of these rules are strictly followed, and in fact they are almost always broken. If every professional writer started his essay by saying "according to Steinbeck's novel, of Mice and Men, blah blah blah"? How many writers use the same boring, monotone sentences each time? An when writing about the same subject, no writer begins the same way as another. The fact is, apart from grammar and vocabulary, in regular High School English classes, you rarely learn anything worthwhile about writing. True, in higher level English classes on the AP and maybe even the Honors level in some districts, as well as in higher education, you learn proper writing, but how many students take that path of education? If such styles are not taught on the most elementary levels, then the school has failed to teach them. We, as Americans, should find it revolting that students with in inability to write properly are being thrown into a world where writing and communication is everything; absolutely crucial. How are they expecting to perform on the caliber of foreign students, who consistently prove that they are better than Americans at writing?

 

Furthermore, the goal of education needs to be relooked. It's based off a commendable idea, yes. An equal social endowment for all citizens is indeed an honorable cause. But clearly, it is a lost one. Not only are students from different areas of the country performing differently, students from different socioeconomic backgrounds also perform differently (on standardized tests). I am not saying that we should give up on education the masses, but clearly we should abandon the idea that at the end of 12 years, assuming kids even get 12 years, each individual will have received the same education. Because that's not true. We are kidding ourselves.

 

Instead education should refocus on the individual. The child himself. We give each child a letter grade, but what really does that letter mean? Who is that child being compared to? The "perfect" student? Perfect says who? Yes, the grades are based off simple answers that are either right or wrong, but since when has it been American to accept just one idea as right? During the Industrial Revolution, perhaps such a state of affairs was acceptable. But in today's global economy, divergent thinking should be the pride of our generation. The ability to problem solve and conceptualize is an extremely important trait. Being able to only perform programmed tasks, such as choose the one right answer, only turns men into machines. And sooner or later, these men's jobs will be replaced by actual machines. And why not? It serves us right, if we are not looking out for our children's education. At least there is someone out there thinking of a better mousetrap. Socially speaking, people are almost always grouped into two groups: Academic and Non-Academic. Smart and stupid. Intelligent and dumb. The smarts get the good grades, go to college, and become successful. The dumbs do not. But are the dumbs really destined to be "inferior"? Do the academic people manage the factory, while the non-academics work in it? No this is an outdated model. Success is not to be divided into two categories. School results should not be placing students into these two categories. It's saying that the only valuable thing about a student is his ability to say what others want to hear; what is "correct". Is that the type of leader we want in the highest echelon of our society? There is so much more to a person, and our current system utterly fails at identifying it.

 

Capitalism has also known the power of the "Invisible Hand", that force that pushes us to become bigger, smarter, and more efficient. It has affected nearly every business, yet education remains an outpost. Education has not been revolutionalized for our modern era. We have not created a more efficient and more competitive workforce. We have been producing the same workforce that was served us in the past, under the misconceived assumption that it will continue to serve us for years to come. Soon, China will become the world's biggest economy. Students in Europe and Asia consistently show they are better than Americans. It's think to rethink the type of workforce we want to produce. In today's global economy, we must increase our standards. We cannot simple give each child a basic education. We must give each child a stellar education, and not just the same one for each student. Education needs to target students. Throw aside the idea that each student will be given the same endowment. Instead, why not give each student a specialized endowment?

 

American education today is not bad, it's misguided. It is preparing students for a era that has long passed. This is evident from every facet of the classroom. The concept here is simple: we must change the education system to prepare students for the reality of the world today, a swirling, global atmosphere that values divergent thinking, creativity, collaboration, and competitiveness on top of the age-old rites of hard-work, discipline, and intelligence.

Wow. I agree with everything stated.

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From what I understand of US education the top universities are great and the levels below that (high school) really suck. If I understand you correctly, the problem with high schools is that they go at the speed of the slowest?

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Armorare requested a rant about education. Sure, here it is. Sorry that it's not great writing. I didn't really have time to organize an essay, so this is really just a flow of unprocessed ideas.

 

My main issue of the American education system is that, in this day and age, it is an obsolete system that caters to beliefs that are now far outdated. The current system, more or less, is largely the same as it was when it was first conceived. Granted, there are differences such as teacher's unions, standardized testing, and various programs, but the blueprint of it has not been revamped significantly.

 

The system, then, is based off ideas dating back to the Enlightenment and caters to an economic atmosphere of the Industrial Revolution. When it was first designed, it was revolutionary. It was theory put into practice. Never before have the people of a nation been given such an equal social endowment before in history. It's no coincidence that this period saw America's greatest growth.

 

This, however, is a mechanic that had aged. The revolutionary ideas: every child should be given an equal opportunity in life, are no longer so revolutionary. Some might argue that it is no longer even feasible. The economic situation has also changed. No longer is America developing into a powerhouse. Today, in the midst of globalization and radical competition between nations across the globe, education should prepare students for more than working in a factory.

 

You might say, "no, schools aren't expecting students to all work in factories after graduation", and that's true. But how the system is designed, that's still how kids are prepared. Deadlines, obedience, discipline, promptness, even the way students are grouped, by age, all reflect the old Industrial Revolution. Surely, today, these are still important. But do they prepare students for a globally competitive environment? Does obeying superiors and doing as they say without question foster the intellectual curiosity and divergent thinking we expect from our nation's greatest political, economic, and social leaders?

 

Too many teachers, furthermore, follow this system without question. English teachers teaching basic classes in high schools are notorious for telling students "formulas" for writing, as a way to make sure they can at least do the bare minimum and hedging a bet that that's all they will need. "You need a TAG statement in your introduction." "Your thesis may not be the first sentence." "The first sentence should go something like 'In literature, race has often been an issue that is discussed'." In higher level work, none of these rules are strictly followed, and in fact they are almost always broken. If every professional writer started his essay by saying "according to Steinbeck's novel, of Mice and Men, blah blah blah"? How many writers use the same boring, monotone sentences each time? An when writing about the same subject, no writer begins the same way as another. The fact is, apart from grammar and vocabulary, in regular High School English classes, you rarely learn anything worthwhile about writing. True, in higher level English classes on the AP and maybe even the Honors level in some districts, as well as in higher education, you learn proper writing, but how many students take that path of education? If such styles are not taught on the most elementary levels, then the school has failed to teach them. We, as Americans, should find it revolting that students with in inability to write properly are being thrown into a world where writing and communication is everything; absolutely crucial. How are they expecting to perform on the caliber of foreign students, who consistently prove that they are better than Americans at writing?

 

Furthermore, the goal of education needs to be relooked. It's based off a commendable idea, yes. An equal social endowment for all citizens is indeed an honorable cause. But clearly, it is a lost one. Not only are students from different areas of the country performing differently, students from different socioeconomic backgrounds also perform differently (on standardized tests). I am not saying that we should give up on education the masses, but clearly we should abandon the idea that at the end of 12 years, assuming kids even get 12 years, each individual will have received the same education. Because that's not true. We are kidding ourselves.

 

Instead education should refocus on the individual. The child himself. We give each child a letter grade, but what really does that letter mean? Who is that child being compared to? The "perfect" student? Perfect says who? Yes, the grades are based off simple answers that are either right or wrong, but since when has it been American to accept just one idea as right? During the Industrial Revolution, perhaps such a state of affairs was acceptable. But in today's global economy, divergent thinking should be the pride of our generation. The ability to problem solve and conceptualize is an extremely important trait. Being able to only perform programmed tasks, such as choose the one right answer, only turns men into machines. And sooner or later, these men's jobs will be replaced by actual machines. And why not? It serves us right, if we are not looking out for our children's education. At least there is someone out there thinking of a better mousetrap. Socially speaking, people are almost always grouped into two groups: Academic and Non-Academic. Smart and stupid. Intelligent and dumb. The smarts get the good grades, go to college, and become successful. The dumbs do not. But are the dumbs really destined to be "inferior"? Do the academic people manage the factory, while the non-academics work in it? No this is an outdated model. Success is not to be divided into two categories. School results should not be placing students into these two categories. It's saying that the only valuable thing about a student is his ability to say what others want to hear; what is "correct". Is that the type of leader we want in the highest echelon of our society? There is so much more to a person, and our current system utterly fails at identifying it.

 

Capitalism has also known the power of the "Invisible Hand", that force that pushes us to become bigger, smarter, and more efficient. It has affected nearly every business, yet education remains an outpost. Education has not been revolutionalized for our modern era. We have not created a more efficient and more competitive workforce. We have been producing the same workforce that was served us in the past, under the misconceived assumption that it will continue to serve us for years to come. Soon, China will become the world's biggest economy. Students in Europe and Asia consistently show they are better than Americans. It's think to rethink the type of workforce we want to produce. In today's global economy, we must increase our standards. We cannot simple give each child a basic education. We must give each child a stellar education, and not just the same one for each student. Education needs to target students. Throw aside the idea that each student will be given the same endowment. Instead, why not give each student a specialized endowment?

 

American education today is not bad, it's misguided. It is preparing students for a era that has long passed. This is evident from every facet of the classroom. The concept here is simple: we must change the education system to prepare students for the reality of the world today, a swirling, global atmosphere that values divergent thinking, creativity, collaboration, and competitiveness on top of the age-old rites of hard-work, discipline, and intelligence.

 

 

*applauds*

 

Enlightening like a harpy. Honestly, not only this took the words from my mouth but made me think of my issues with the education system in a new way. Let's harpy orgy at this.

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From what I understand of US education the top universities are great and the levels below that (high school) really suck. If I understand you correctly, the problem with high schools is that they go at the speed of the slowest?

 

That is not, I think a problem. What better way to measure success as a whole than by the potential instilled on those at the bottom of the ladder? The truth is, I think, that every society moves at the speed of the slowest.

 

Rather, my problem is that the current educational model is outdated. It builds and is built upon ideas that are no longer relevant in today's society. That is the real issue here and what I believe is the root of all the other problems people attribute to education.

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English teachers teaching basic classes in high schools are notorious for telling students "formulas" for writing, as a way to make sure they can at least do the bare minimum and hedging a bet that that's all they will need. "You need a TAG statement in your introduction." "Your thesis may not be the first sentence." "The first sentence should go something like 'In literature, race has often been an issue that is discussed'." In higher level work, none of these rules are strictly followed, and in fact they are almost always broken. If every professional writer started his essay by saying "according to Steinbeck's novel, of Mice and Men, blah blah blah"? How many writers use the same boring, monotone sentences each time? An when writing about the same subject, no writer begins the same way as another. The fact is, apart from grammar and vocabulary, in regular High School English classes, you rarely learn anything worthwhile about writing. True, in higher level English classes on the AP and maybe even the Honors level in some districts, as well as in higher education, you learn proper writing, but how many students take that path of education? If such styles are not taught on the most elementary levels, then the school has failed to teach them. We, as Americans, should find it revolting that students with in inability to write properly are being thrown into a world where writing and communication is everything; absolutely crucial. How are they expecting to perform on the caliber of foreign students, who consistently prove that they are better than Americans at writing?

Oh god, this. I never really learned how to break out of the formula that they taught us throughout high school until the last year of IB courses, by which point the damage was already done. Creative writing was actually rejected as a course there, or I would have taken it as soon as possible. There's too much focus on teaching a narrow interpretation of certain texts, and it probably prevents students from taking the subject seriously in later life.

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It's pretty fascinating that so many of you have the same opinion. Just goes to show the extent of the damage in the system. It works really well for some people but a nationwide education system needs to be more flexible than that.

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It's pretty fascinating that so many of you have the same opinion. Just goes to show the extent of the damage in the system. It works really well for some people but a nationwide education system needs to be more flexible than that.

 

Annoying part is that people still think that "one size fits all" and try to force you to fit your feet into that damn show regardless if you feel uncomfortable after that. We need to toss that damn mentality aside. In fact, we need to throw our mentality of being clingy and preserving almost everywhere away and change.

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I love and miss you guys tremendously.

Who wants to give me their old account so I can start playing again? :D

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I totally agree.

 

American society is increasing adopting a "one-size-fits-all" mentality. You can see it also very clearly in jurisprudence. I think that's shameful, especially in fields that is American by nature--public education and law.

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I totally agree.

 

American society is increasing adopting a "one-size-fits-all" mentality. You can see it also very clearly in jurisprudence. I think that's shameful, especially in fields that is American by nature--public education and law.

 

And people who don't try to "fit into that size" by any means will get tossed aside. That's why I mainly haven't found a job easily. It's not "nonconformity", but that I don't share that mentality of following things mindlessly and going against the flow America is going but not changing the flow towards. I wonder if some top universities have a little bit of that mentality too because they're in the States.

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It doesn't seem like anyone is going towards any solutions either. Their just hoping that eventually it'll figure itself out, and it won't.

 

The main problem that I have is that the system isn't even helping the bottom rung of students it was designed to help. Most of these kids are going to end up in a working industry; something that doesn't take too much higher education (construction, etc.). But under the current system, these students are getting absolutely no job training. Why does that D student need English? He's not going to be a writer. Prepare him for work in the industry, so he can walk out of this place with a sense of direction and some skills. A lot of the graduating class has no idea where to go after high school. All they've been prepared for is the next year of school, the next years of school, and so on, until their thrown out into the world.

 

My Econ/History teacher's solutions:

Get rid of NCLB. It's almost entirely useless. It's a waste of resources that could be used to further academics in our country. It also makes it damn near impossible to fail. If a child is going to fail, do you know what most teachers are instructed to do? Pass them. Not hold them back until they are ready, just straight up pass them. This child keeps floating through school because no one's pushing him. In the end, he ends up with no ambition, no intelligence, and most importantly, no skills. Was this the goal of NCLB? Also, he brought up the fact that it is actually unconstitutional. Apparently education is a state right, and they are not allowed to set a national reform for education. So there's that.

 

Another solution: trade schools. When you're 16 or so, you can choose whether or not you want to enter the work force, or continue pursuing education. Go to college, or learn some skills and do something with your life. Covers basically every group of students except for the failures, who were bound to fail anyway.

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It doesn't seem like anyone is going towards any solutions either. Their just hoping that eventually it'll figure itself out, and it won't.

 

The main problem that I have is that the system isn't even helping the bottom rung of students it was designed to help. Most of these kids are going to end up in a working industry; something that doesn't take too much higher education (construction, etc.). But under the current system, these students are getting absolutely no job training. Why does that D student need English? He's not going to be a writer. Prepare him for work in the industry, so he can walk out of this place with a sense of direction and some skills. A lot of the graduating class has no idea where to go after high school. All they've been prepared for is the next year of school, the next years of school, and so on, until their thrown out into the world.

 

My Econ/History teacher's solutions:

Get rid of NCLB. It's almost entirely useless. It's a waste of resources that could be used to further academics in our country. It also makes it damn near impossible to fail. If a child is going to fail, do you know what most teachers are instructed to do? Pass them. Not hold them back until they are ready, just straight up pass them. This child keeps floating through school because no one's pushing him. In the end, he ends up with no ambition, no intelligence, and most importantly, no skills. Was this the goal of NCLB? Also, he brought up the fact that it is actually unconstitutional. Apparently education is a state right, and they are not allowed to set a national reform for education. So there's that.

 

Another solution: trade schools. When you're 16 or so, you can choose whether or not you want to enter the work force, or continue pursuing education. Go to college, or learn some skills and do something with your life. Covers basically every group of students except for the failures, who were bound to fail anyway.

 

 

And it encourages those who are failing to try not fail. Make push go to shove and drag them into the right direction. It was bad enough my old high school wasn't taking college seriously, but they are failing standards set by that stupid NCLB thing and are in deeper crap. Yet they insist they can stay as they are and still succeed....

 

 

...morons. :roll:

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From what I understand of US education the top universities are great and the levels below that (high school) really suck. If I understand you correctly, the problem with high schools is that they go at the speed of the slowest?

 

The goal of the American education system is an equal education for each child? I know very little about the American education system, but from what I've heard of school districts, this sounds like bullshit.

 

Could someone please enlighten me? I'm sure I'm missing something.

 

Also agree with the whole writing thing. Basically, beginner writing courses you're taught to follow a formula, advanced writing courses teach you to forget the [bleep]ing formula.

 

I actually think it's a good idea for the option to opt into trade schools at 16. I knew several high school kids who knew that they had to complete high school because they'd be pretty [bleep]ed in life if they didn't, yet didn't not see any conceivable way their diploma would help them in life. (Beyond being able to say, hey, look at me, I have a HS diploma.) Not to mention a lot of crap we learn in high school is useless. Social studies (a combination of geography, history and politics) is a fascinating subject, yet not practical. A good deal of English is useless, particularly those essay formulas. When I was taking my Grade 12 math diploma review, the instructor (very good teacher who was paid very good money to help us get a very good mark on the exam) straight up told us that most of us would not need to remember most of the stuff we studied after we completed the exam...

 

Yeah, come to think of it, the Canadian school system could use some work as well. Honestly, after like 16 school should be optional. I knew many high school kids who were only in high school because they system demanded it, and they weren't going to drop out. They still put in minimal effort. I think it's common for someone to goof off in high school, because they don't see the point of it and slack off and party or something, then once they're like 20 they realize that, [bleep], they need to go back to school.

 

Also, this is a good read:

 

http://www.cracked.com/blog/5-ways-we-ruined-occupy-wall-street-generation/

 

Cracked really has some good stuff every now and then. About half of it is written by John Cheese.

Squab unleashes Megiddo! Completed all quests and hard diaries. 75+ Skiller. (At one point.) 2000+ total. 99 Magic.
[spoiler=The rest of my sig. You know you wanna see it.]

my difinition of noob is i dont like u, either u are better then me or u are worst them me

Buying spins make you a bad person...don't do it. It's like buying nukes for North Korea.

Well if it bothers you that the game is more fun now, then you can go cry in a corner. :shame:

your article was the equivalent of a circumcized porcupine

The only thing wrong with it is the lack of a percentage for when you need to stroke it.

 


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Poignant Purple to Lokie's Ravishing Red and Alg's Brilliant Blue.

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Yeah, I couldn't find this pair of shoes that I was looking for. So I gave up and walked out of the closet. It smells like mothballs in there. <_<

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TROLL_FACE_Snappels_first_troll-s469x140-251123-535.jpg

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