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Choosing a career and education

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Though there is also several well paying blue collar jobs too, such as electricians and plumbers. I know someone who makes around $25 dollars an hour I believe, for a 10-hour 4 day workweek as an electrician.

Which country is this? 25 an hour is apprentice wages where I am :/

 

I work in the electricity supply industry doing my electrical trade. Working on powerlines, substations etc instead of regular electrical work. I hate wiring houses but I love this job.

 

I'm also studying electrical engineering in my 3rd year since my company pays for it and I can study on their time which gives me more space to move around in the industry.

 

My job will always be in high demand, especially with storms constantly pulling lines down etc.

 

Yeah, I am pretty certain that is wrong. Sorry about that, I will correct that part.

 

Some while back, I had asked his wife about how much he made an hour. She said she believed it was around 25 dollars an hour. I think she simply made a mistake.

 

From my understanding, hes probably making around $2400-2600 a month. So around $15-16 dollars an hour seems far more accurate to me.

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Well, I'm pretty much into the stuff already. I first started by going to college in Biotechnology, but ended up dropping out on the second year, out of boredom. I then got a 2 year degree in computer programming, and worked for a year in the domain, but then got fired because of cuts (last in, first out), but I do have extremely good references for future jobs. Pay was very good too (at least for my region, $32 000/year). I am now starting another course, still in computers, but this time it is networking and security, another 2 year degree, which should make it easier to get jobs, plus I liked it more than the actual programming from what I did in the past.

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I'm nearly finished a 3 year BA in Geography. Not too sure what I want to do, but I've applied for Teacher's College next year, so I'll see how that goes.


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I'm starting my second year, going for a MEng in Chemical Engineering with placement (also amusingly known as a sandwich course), but I have no idea what I'm going to do with it. icon_redface.gif I think where I end up for placement will give me more of an idea of what I want to take for a career, but if not, you can use science or IT degrees like that for loads of things, even if they're not directly related to the specific course.

 

I think the OP would probably be best off looking at Computer Sciences. I've got many good friends in that sector and I hear it's an enjoyable course.


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I'm starting my 3rd year of a mechanical engineering degree.

 

My plan at the moment is to complete a MESc (masters) degree in the same field after graduating. Unsurprisingly, I plan to work as an engineer in some capacity, however I'm not really sure in what area, since mechanical engineering is very broad. Still trying to decide whether I like robotics/automation, fluid mechanics, or materials science the best, since those are 3 areas that I could potentially get a job in.

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bachelors in anything except medicine, engineering, law or particular sciences are worthless

 

i will come back and rant on this later

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I wouldn't say they're worthless. I mean yes, they might be worthless in the sense that you may not learn anything relevant to a future career, but there are a lot of companies who will insist that applicants have a bachelors degree (any kind). Sometimes regardless of talent or natural skills, applications by people without degrees are just thrown out of the pile to cut the pile down. So if you want a steady job with a good salary but do not want to go into medicine, engineering, law, or science, it's usually better if you do get a degree, even if just for the sake of having a piece of paper that will help you get more job opportunities.


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bachelors in anything except medicine, engineering, law or particular sciences are worthless

 

i will come back and rant on this later

 

Given that bachelor's degrees in law and medicine don't exist this position seems a bit suspect.

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I'm currently attending a community college for Automotive Technology, and have plans to become a tech. My job is in high demand, but it's hard to get started due to the importance of experience, you know... the whole "need a job to get a job" roundabout. I'll expect to be paid around 60-70k/year once I become an actual certified service tech, which is around what I think most people consider "middle class". Hopefully If I work hard enough I can earn up around 90-100k as a master technician with some businesses. I also want to go to a university to fully learn mechanical engineering for personal dreams, but since I have no interest in engineering as a career, financially it would be foolish to do so.

 

Besides, mechanics are the kind of people I can relate to. Not sure how I'd like working with engineers...


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bachelors in anything except medicine, engineering, law or particular sciences are worthless

 

i will come back and rant on this later

 

Given that bachelor's degrees in law and medicine don't exist this position seems a bit suspect.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachelor_of_Medicine,_Bachelor_of_Surgery

 

using "bachelors" as a umbrella term. thought you'd get that. apparently not. if you were thinking I was referring to purely undergraduate studies, then no, you misunderstood. (the system is different in the US, but in Australia and I assume most other western nations both law and medicine can be taken straight out of highschool, no need to do premed / preclincal studies or have a previous undergrad degree.)

 

in any case, I should explain myself. (for the sake of transparency; i'm pursuing an adv sci degree - microbiology/biochemistry major - hopefully medicine soon.) let me begin by saying my degree is not that useful. there are plenty of science graduates, too many infact - most of which without pursuing an honours or masters will have not too many opportunities (that are DIRECTLY related to their degree) available to them.

 

no education is worthless, let me clarify - but if you are looking for financial security and employment (which is why most seek to go to college), there are routes which are more rewarding. no doubt in your parent's and grandparent's generations a diploma or degree ensured a job (a direct correlation with post secondary education and earning power) - I can no longer agree with this - why ?

 

simply because of a) some of the degrees people choose cannot not afford them much financial security or the prospect of employment. (liberal arts, english, arts degree, communication / journalism etc etc etc). I understand that people pursue these things out of an passion, and genuine interest but that's a different story altogether. if you dont want to shell out ~80K for an education such as this

-> go to a library.

 

b) oversaturation. you have to realize that only a fraction of people with a college degree go on to do work that is related to their degree. You might be saying of course - "no [cabbage], a college degree doesn't guarantee employment." realize, In the current economic climate (this is more relevant to the US), who the hell is going to hire 2 million college graduates (crippling student loans, lack of experience, etc). the system has changed from giving students the appropriate skills for employment to funnelling in an absurd amount of people to get college degree when they should have instead gone for vocational training. current infrastructure just cannot/does not support it - (call it whatever you want, greed, if it makes you happy.)

 

if you pick up a b philosophy / b arts /(with the intention of "broadening your horizons") great, just don't be unhappy working as a receptionist. the same goes for commerce (and accounting) students -> 4 year degree only to end up as a 40 hr per week wage slave.

 

i've waffled on enough and yet could probably keep talking, but i'll get to the point of what i was saying. degrees are still important, yes. of course. a computer science, engineering, pharmaceutical, medical related degree will teach you just the same relevant set of skills (problem solving, analytical thinking etc) as commerce or arts degree will. the distinction lies in :

 

i) experience / willingness / motivation. example - commerce degree, work your ass off to get an internship with (KPMG / pwc / ernst & young) get an MBA, build practical skills and experience. a degree will only get you so far (everyone has a bachelors in something these days). it's a tool and nothing else, application of effort, networking and experience is the determinant.

 

I only intended to say this.

 

-

 

Apologies for the lack of capitalization, little punctuation and at times, broken english. tired.

 

EDIT:

 

tl;dr a comp sci graduate is going to find it easier to get a job than an arts student. however, both are fundamentally "worthless" without application.

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I wrote a long post in response to adrenal but it sounded stupid and I realized I didn't really have a point.

 

Essentially, I agree with you overall, however I don't think it's fair to generalize that everyone in a "less rigorous" degree is wasting their time.

I do think that many of them are simply uninformed or have been pushed by peers/parents to get a degree when it doesn't make sense for them to do so. When everyone has a degree, it's worth nothing. Lots of people just aren't meant to do a degree, and would be happier (and more successful) by focusing on finding a trade/job instead of spending years/money at university.

 

Another point I think is important is that most people just aren't ready for the real world at 18... I wasn't. A few more years to experience living alone and having to study hard can't hurt. And if you use it as your last chance to party before you get a real job... then sure, probably the same outcome.

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O/T:

Got my bachelors degree in biochemisrty, started to work as a research technician. Never regretted "only" doing bachelor degree, I like the "hands-on" type of workt that I do now as a researcher.


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Other data was removed when acoount got hacked...

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I wouldn't say they're worthless. I mean yes, they might be worthless in the sense that you may not learn anything relevant to a future career, but there are a lot of companies who will insist that applicants have a bachelors degree (any kind). Sometimes regardless of talent or natural skills, applications by people without degrees are just thrown out of the pile to cut the pile down. So if you want a steady job with a good salary but do not want to go into medicine, engineering, law, or science, it's usually better if you do get a degree, even if just for the sake of having a piece of paper that will help you get more job opportunities.

 

Yeah, sometimes going to college isn't even a matter of improving skills or covering new territories - it's just to establish your credibility. But I also think he brought up a good point - kids need to be entering college because they have a steady game plan and because getting that particular degree is the next step in achieving their well thought-out goals - not just because "college = rich".

 

Basically, people just need to understand what they're getting themselves into when they sign up. There are too many dropouts that come to this realization after they're already obligated to pay for their tuition. Main reason why I waited so long to enter myself.

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