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surge protector UL label problem....


im1knight

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how come my surge protector come with a UL label of "relocatable power strip"? I mean this is not a very cheap surge protector... but according to

 

http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/su ... ector6.htm , a surge protector must have a UL listing of transient voltage surge suppressor.....

 

 

 

Well....i found this"transient voltage surge suppressor" label on my 9 dollar surge protector, which only hold up to 109joules... Now i can't find it on my $25 surge protector that hold up to 2500joules with max voltage of 6000v? The $9 one is made by GE, which i guess is a pretty good brand on electronics, and my $25 one is by Radioshack, which i brought from their store... Both of them have indicator light, and the $25 one from Radioshack included protection to modems and cable.

 

 

 

So is there any experts out there that can tell me how important this UL listing label is? I mean i saw it on the website.. but does it REALLY matters when it comes to a big power surge? When a big one comes, which of these 2 will hold up? There are some construction going on around my house, and the power surge is a problem since the first day i moved in here, every time the AC starts,refrigerator starts, ceiling fan starts, or even microwave starts, the lights blink, and my speaker make a "pop" sound, this never happened at my old house so...idk....There's 2 computers hooked up to this, so if it doesn't do the job right, i'm losing over $1700 when the worst happens...

 

 

 

any ideas? thanks!.

 

oh..and i can't buy a more expensive surge protector since they are generally huge and there's no room to fit it under my table

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So is there any experts out there that can tell me how important this UL listing label is? I mean i saw it on the website.. but does it REALLY matters when it comes to a big power surge? When a big one comes, which of these 2 will hold up? There are some construction going on around my house, and the power surge is a problem since the first day i moved in here, every time the AC starts,refrigerator starts, ceiling fan starts, or even microwave starts, the lights blink, and my speaker make a "pop" sound, this never happened at my old house so...idk....There's 2 computers hooked up to this, so if it doesn't do the job right, i'm losing over $1700 when the worst happens...

 

Your problems started when you read that "How Stuff Works" citation that is chock full of myths and outright technical lies. For example, your appliances are not creating surges. 1) It appliances did, then a surge protector would be toast in weeks or months. 2) Then each appliance would destroy itself first. 3) Then you are trooping to the hardware store everyday to replace dimmer switched, smoke detectors, and your dishwasher.

 

 

 

UL testing is for human safety - nothing more. That "How Stuff Works" implied UL says it does something useful. Nonsense. The protector can even fail - provide no protection - and still get UL approval. UL simply says it must not spit sparks and flame during the test. It can provide no transistor protection. But as long as it does not threaten human life, then it gets UL registered.

 

 

 

Apparently you have assumed joules determines protection as if a protector absorbs surges. No protector stops or absorbs surges. But the myth does promote sales. The effective protector 'diverts' surge energy where it can be harmlessly dissipated. But that means the protector must be connected short (ie 'less than 10 feet') to what absorbs surges. Earth ground.

 

 

 

An effective protector must divert even direct lightning strikes harmlessly to earth AND remain functional. But remaining functional would not promote sales. So protectors are often undersized. That failure gets the naive to say, "My protector sacrificed itself to save my computer." Reality: surge struck protector and computer simultaneously and equally. Surge was too small to overwhelm protection required inside every computer (required for generations). But that same trivial surge easily harmed a protector. Damage gets the naive to promote the protector and buy more.

 

 

 

An effective protector does not absorb surges. It does not block surges. It is connected (hardwired and short) to what absorbs surge energy - earth ground. Effective protectors remain functional even after a direct lightning strike. Nobody knows a surge even existed. So the naive cannot recommend whole house protectors. One protector means everything gets protected even from direct lightning strikes. And trivial (mythical) surges (ie refrigerator) also cannot exist.

 

 

 

How do we get a protector to absorb even less energy? Increase its joules. Higher joules means it absorbs less energy and does better protection. More joules means even more energy is dissipated harmlessly in earth; less energy dissipated by the protector. Note the reality. Less energy absorbed means the protector is even better contrary to popular myths. See MOV manufacturer datasheets for details.

 

 

 

When playing specmanship games (ie to those who could not see the myths are in "How Stuff Works"), hype joules so that the naive believe it somehow absorbs surges. Worse, 345 joules in a UPS or power strip may only use 115 joules in protection and never more than 230. They simply forget to mention which joules actually get used. That means it might fail more often promote more sales.

 

 

 

Where surge damage can never happen, only 'whole house' protectors and even better earthing is installed. For example, your telco CO is connected to overhead wires all over town. How often has your town been without phone service for four days while they replace that surge damaged computer? COs suffer about 100 surges with every thunderstorm. COs use 'whole house' protectors and waste no money on power strip protectors - for good reason. Show us the numeric specs that claim that power strip provided protection? You cannot because no such protection specs exist. Just another reason why telcos waste no money on that protector.

 

 

 

A protector is only as effective as its earth ground. That means a dedicated connection typically less than 10 feet. All incoming wires connected short to that same earthing electrode. Even no sharp wire bends. Ground wire separated from all other wires. No power strip protection does that. A power strip protector makes no protection claims. Telcos - that suffer 100 surges with each thunderstorm - waste no money on plug-in protectors. They need protection. They use whole house protectors and better earthing to never have damage.

 

 

 

To protect your computers, one 'whole house' protector and earthing that meets and exceeds post 1990 National Electrical Code earthing requirements. A 'whole house' protector does not provide protection. The protector is simply a connecting device - 'diverts' surges to what is protection - earth ground. Earth is where even direct lightning strikes are harmlessly dissipated. And the protector remains completely functional after every direct lightning strike.

 

 

 

Manufacturers of effective protectors include Square D, Siemens, GE, Intermatic, Cutler-Hammer, Keison, and Leviton. No such protectors are sold by Belkin, APC, Tripplite, or Monster Cable. The latter are only interested in massive profits selling the $7 protector circuit for up to $150. The naïve say it must be better because it cost more. Same people who believed How Stuff Works.

 

 

 

See wires above the street. When lightning strikes that wire, it is a direct strike to household appliances. It finds earth ground, destructively via appliances. Everywhere in the world where damage is not acceptable, a protector earths before a direct strike can enter the building. Then surges need not find earth ground destructively via appliances. That is how surge protection was done even 100 years ago.

 

 

 

When selling a $3 power strip with some 10 cent parts for $25 or $150, why would they be honest? The $150 protector selling in Circuit City is the same protector selling for $7 in the grocery store. When a majority believe myths rather than learn facts, then profits are too obscene to be honest. When the naive see the protector fail and then recommend more, well, appreciate that junk science is alive, well, and profitable.

 

 

 

So where are those numeric specs that define each type of surge with numbers? No power strip protector can make that claim. Somehow its 109 joules will stop and absorb hundreds of thousands of joules in a surge? That is what the naïve claim.

 

 

 

A protector is a connecting device. Protection is another component of the system. Every protection 'system' is defined by the only item that must always exist what is protection - single point earth ground. Above discusses secondary protection. Also learn about the primary protection 'system'. But this quick summary is probably too much.

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