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Gandalf14141

Programming Languages

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Long story short, I am a college student and I am trying to learn some different programming languages. I have taken an Intro to Java class already and will be taking an "intermediate" level course next semester. I am no pro in Java (as Stev would know). When I've looked at different internships they all require that someone has knowledge in multiple languages so I am just wondering what languages would be good to have some experience in. I'm not looking to master it anytime in the future, but I just want some experience so that when asked about it I can answer questions or do some simple things, and as a resume builder. Some languages that I have thought about were:

  • Javascript
  • Python
  • Cobol
  • Ruby on Rails
  • Visual Basic??? (The university has on online course over the summer)

I will be attempting to teach myself at least one of these languages throughout the year. Which would be deemed the most important to an employer?

 

To anyone who replies, I thank you.


Finally on here to update that I have officially quit! It's been fun.
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60,816th to 99 Fletching 03/07/09|220,309th Person to be Able to Kill Dusties 10 Year Cape on 12/20/14[/hide]

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Long story short, I am a college student and I am trying to learn some different programming languages. I have taken an Intro to Java class already and will be taking an "intermediate" level course next semester. I am no pro in Java (as Stev would know).

Do I have more homework next semester? :P.

 

HTML5 would be a great idea. The reason I say this is because using HTML5, you'll touch on and learn JavaScript and CSS. Having already taken Java, JavaScript will be a breeze for you. With web-apps and things becoming more and more common, it's (they've) got one hell of a bright future.

 

Visual Basic is actually used a lot - just don't tell anybody. I'm going to get shanked for saying this but.. It's fast, stable, easy(er) to maintain, and easy to learn. I'd definitely recommend giving it a shot as there's still a lot of money to be made. It's gotten a bad rap, but it'll do the same job as other languages, only with less mileage. Usually the people who bash VB are the ones who've never used it and simply go by the public's general opinion and things they read.

 

Python was personally one of my favorites. I don't know why, though, other then personal preference and what I used to design with it. I used it back when we were creating map layouts and templates for Wulfram II and loooved it. But, my opinion may be a bit skewed because I was a kid designing for a game I loved. I have no excuses for not keeping up with it, which I regret.

 

But, I've got things to get done before bed. Will keep an eye on this thread though. :). I look forward to more homework. ^^.


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I think if you're going to going to use those shortcut languages, you should learn Java and C++ first. Doing it the other way around will just cause trouble. Knowing PHP and JavaScript will open a lot of doors as well.

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Yes, I'm still awake. >.<

 

What are your reasons for C++ over something like VB? Especially for a beginner?

 

IDK how I hadn't thought of PHP. I've been using it and getting back into it a fair bit recently. Thinking about it though, it depends entirely on what his goals are. Depending on his goals for his career/hobby, some of these might be of literally no use other then experience. >.<


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So that you have a better understanding of how and why things work. I feel like C++ teaches that a lot better than higher level languages do.

 

And yeah web development is a big field, so it's at least worth experimenting with.

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I'm actually wanting to go into Database Administration or Networking, so does that change anything up?


Finally on here to update that I have officially quit! It's been fun.
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R.I.P Billy Mays and <3 My Friend C.D.S 7/8/09 <3
60,816th to 99 Fletching 03/07/09|220,309th Person to be Able to Kill Dusties 10 Year Cape on 12/20/14[/hide]

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C/C++ is necessary for understanding key concepts and logical programming.

 

I'd expect any competent programmer to have knowledge of most languages.

 

My favourite languages are Python, C/C++, JavaScript.

I do not like Java at all, although it is still quite good.

Functional languages such as Haskell are interesting...

 

Database Management and Networking are mainly tool based. You'd need to know a shell language such as bash. For databases you'll need to know SQL and a language to perform SQL statements. Database management SQL would probably be better suited to a scripting language such as python.

 

Apps are unfortunately popular now. Java(android), xcode/C++/objective c?(apple), HTML+CSS+JavaScript.

 

It's hard to suggest a language because IMO you should learn a language that enables you to complete interesting goals quickly otherwise you get frustrated and bored quickly. My first language was Small/Pawn for AMXX where I scripted server plugins for a game called counterstrike. When I had finished a plugin I had something I could share with others and play with which was great as fun. Nowadays I do impulse projects - example, my friend was using a JavaScript IRC client yesterday, I decided I'd write a grease monkey script to hook the qwebirc client and create an IRC bot. The interesting part being the hooking process(JavaScript is fun). It doesn't stop there though. Once I discovered I liked JavaScript I decided I'd compile googles v8 JavaScript engine which is written in C++. So now I'm using JavaScript in C++( have done this for CPython too).

 

 

Imo, http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/, follow this tutorial up until object oriented programming. Data types, operators, control structures and functions are core to most languages. Then have a play around and look at other languages.

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VB is still used a lot, sure, and there are definitely jobs in it, but more and more companies are forgoing it for new projects. C# does everything VB does without the little idiosyncrasies. I've used both VB and C# extensively and have never found vb to have any advantage over C#, yet c# has many advantages over VB. There's a reason Microsoft writes the vast majority of their .NET code in c#.

 

I agree with learning the web stack (Html/css/js). There are tons of jobs out there for that stuff.


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"It's not a rest for me, it's a rest for the weights." - Dom Mazzetti

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Pick a language, become comfortable. 80-90% of what you learn in that language will be applicable to other languages, the rest is syntax and tricks and tips. Programming in an unfamiliar language will then simplify to figuring out what you need to do (do x, y, then z), and then finding how you can do it (which libraries are available, how do I access this element of this list, what is the syntax to etc).

 

C is a good language to learn with Java, because C clearly demonstrates what Java is trying to accomplish and why it does what it does.

 

HTML5 is good to learn as well. The best advice I can give you is to learn something that you'll need on the job, having a little experience in 10 different languages that the employer would never use is worse than being proficient in the one language they do use.

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99 dungeoneering achieved, thanks to everyone that celebrated with me!

 

♪♪ Don't interrupt me as I struggle to complete this thought
Have some respect for someone more forgetful than yourself ♪♪

♪♪ And I'm not done
And I won't be till my head falls off ♪♪

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