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Computer Compat/Graphics Card/diminishing returns


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I'm building a new computer with undefined cost; I don't need this to be great but I want it to be decent. When does the cost: performance ration start to increase.

 

 

 

 

 

Main point is I'm going totry and build a comp.

 

 

 

I just wanted to ask a few basic questions.

 

 

 

How do you know if parts are compatible, and what are the basic parts I'll need.

 

 

 

so...

 

Is quad core> dual core for the cost or vise verse.

 

what kind of wattage of power supply is best

 

8800 or 9600 (geforce) for a graphics card.

 

I'll need quite a lot of help going along trying to figure this out, so expect me to post back with specific parts as i figure itout.

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Im guessing around the 700-800 range. :?

 

Not really that sure though.

 

Wait for Nadril or OldJoe to post.

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First of all, this all depends on what you are going to do with it and your budget. If it's a standard, office computer than you don't need to spend a lot on a video card. Likewise if you're gaming then it all depends on what games you are playing (There is a difference between, say, Crysis and runescape HD).

 

 

 

Finally you need to decide if you want to future proof your machine or not. For example, if you got a quad core now you probably are not getting the same price/performance ratio as you would a core2duo for video games. However quad cores most likely will be better in the future (so a 2.4ghz quad core would be better than a closely priced, say, 2.7ghz Core2duo).

 

 

 

 

 

Also I should say there usually is a big jump between mid range and a high range machine. Often times the best price bracket is around $800-$1,200. (From personal experience). That gives you enough to build a machine capable of running anything on the market today and in the future. Also if you plan it well you can easily future proof it.

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First of all, this all depends on what you are going to do with it and your budget. If it's a standard, office computer than you don't need to spend a lot on a video card. Likewise if you're gaming then it all depends on what games you are playing (There is a difference between, say, Crysis and runescape HD).

 

 

 

Finally you need to decide if you want to future proof your machine or not. For example, if you got a quad core now you probably are not getting the same price/performance ratio as you would a core2duo for video games. However quad cores most likely will be better in the future (so a 2.4ghz quad core would be better than a closely priced, say, 2.7ghz Core2duo).

 

 

 

 

 

Also I should say there usually is a big jump between mid range and a high range machine. Often times the best price bracket is around $800-$1,200. (From personal experience). That gives you enough to build a machine capable of running anything on the market today and in the future. Also if you plan it well you can easily future proof it.

 

 

 

It's a hybrid. I'll be playing tf2 and COD4, but not crysis or anything. And in the futureproofing aspect I either need to use it for another 3 years or another 7 years :P

 

Is 7 even possible?

Thoroughly retired, may still write now and again

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Just one piece of advice: go for a good cooling system if you want to drag it out as long as possible. Those tiny, cramped little miniboxes that are shoved in a corner only last a few years from heat buildup. Get a big, open case with as many fan vents as possible, with an aftermarket CPU cooler and possibly a GPU cooler depending on your card.

 

 

 

Other then that, if your investing a decent amount (1,000-1,200+) your probably better off with a quad core. The downside is that current games and programs will run significantly slower - anything that's single core, as most programs are now, are only going to be able to run at whatever clock speed they are rated, with the muti-cores not even coming into play. So a program running on, say, a 2 ghz quad core will run 1.5x slower then a 3 ghz dual core, despite the quad core costing the same amount. In the future, when most programs are multithreaded, you'll want a quad core. So if your going for 7 years, go quad :P

 

 

 

I can't give you specific recommendations for the parts, but I would advise the 1,000-1,300 range; you can get a really nice system that you won't have to waste a lot of time waiting on or toning down games for the next few years.

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Yeah, I've heard that. I'm still considering price range. Just cause what I'm doing now isn't that awfully intense I think I'm best off with quad core.

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Since you seem sure of building yourself, do you want some links to Newegg for parts, circa 1000$?

 

Edit: Was bored, so i made a little computer for you here:

 

 

 

Antec 300 - 60$

 

AMD Phenom 2, 920(2.8ghz, quad) - 184$

 

Gigabyte GA-MA790X-UD4 - 115$

 

G-Skill 4gb PC2 8500 - 53$

 

Sunbeam CR-CCTF - 40$

 

Samsung dvd/cd read/write lightscribe (oem) - 25$

 

Corsair TX650w - 95$

 

WD Caviar 640GB (oem) - 75$

 

Sata2 cables (x2) - 14$ (for hd/optical drive)

 

MSI GTX260 - 230$

 

or

 

Powercolor HD4870 - 195$

 

 

 

=856$ (881$ with GTX260)

 

With rebates: 806$ (826$ with GTX260).

 

Note: I picked the Corsair 650 psu because after rebate it is only 70$. Overspeced, yes, but for 70$ after rebate it is a really nice deal.

 

Note2: If you want a modular psu instead it will cost more, but less of a "rats nest" in the case.

 

 

 

Monitor/keyboard/mouse/speakers - ask someone else.

 

If you don't want the graphics cards i posted - go for a 9800GTX+ or HD4850.

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Modular PSU?

 

 

 

And if i wanted to take a steup down on thre graphics card what would be good.

 

 

 

Google or Yahoo...

 

Detachable cables.

 

 

 

I said 9800gtx+ or 4850.

 

If you don't want that, get a 9800gt or 4830.

 

Btw, get a tube of arctic silver 5.

J'adore aussi le sexe et les snuff movies

Je trouve que ce sont des purs moments de vie

Je ne me reconnais plus dans les gens

Je suis juste un cas désespérant

Et comme personne ne viendra me réclamer

Je terminerai comme un objet retrouvé

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Where do you use this thermal compound? I googled it, looks like it's for the processor in some way but...

 

 

 

Thanks

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You apply a small dab of it on top of the CPU (or on the bottom of the CPU's heatsink, whatever) once it is on the motherboard. Then when you put on the heatsink make sure you apply a little pressure so that the compound gets all of the top of the CPU.

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Any modifications to the build he has: I'm liking it so far.

 

 

 

(I'll need help doing this: instructions can only be so in-depth)

 

 

 

And if you wanted to go up to comp's price range what would be good to improve on this thing.

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Nothing specific, but this is how I would do it.

 

 

 

 

 

Put CPU and heatsink on motherboard > Put PSU in case > Put motherboard in case > Put Video card in > Put RAM in > Plug everything into PSU > Plug remaining things in (like the case controls to mobo).

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I personally find it easier adding the psu after the motherboard.

 

Guide - http://www.nordichardware.com/Guides/?skrivelse=432

 

Hope you have a relative or a friend who can help you, it's not hard once you get a hold of it, but it would make it alot easier.

 

Remember to be grounded!!! If you don't feel comfortable, you can buy a anti-static wrist wrap for a fiver.

J'adore aussi le sexe et les snuff movies

Je trouve que ce sont des purs moments de vie

Je ne me reconnais plus dans les gens

Je suis juste un cas désespérant

Et comme personne ne viendra me réclamer

Je terminerai comme un objet retrouvé

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What's a good thing to be grounded to...

 

And what about peripherals: mouse keyboard screen etc. Any ideas?

 

Just get a anti-static wrist strap and attach it to metal in your case.

 

Or just remember to touch the metal in your case before you touch anything else. Whichever works.

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WONGTONG IS THE BEST AND IS MORE SUPERIOR THAN ME

#1 Wongtong stalker.

Im looking for some No Limit soldiers!

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I just tap the metal in the case, it works fine. Also, wash your hands with soap or handwash etc, just because you're touching delicate equipment, it's a good idea to have clean hands. Grease isn't particularly good for circuits.

 

 

 

This is my personal way of putting a pc together:

 

motherboard - psu - hard drive and disk drives - RAM - cpu/heatsink - video cards/sounds cards etc - connect it all up

 

 

 

I think that's all the parts, though I've probably missed something. #-o

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What's a good thing to be grounded to...

 

And what about peripherals: mouse keyboard screen etc. Any ideas?

 

Just get a anti-static wrist strap and attach it to metal in your case.

 

Or just remember to touch the metal in your case before you touch anything else. Whichever works.

 

 

 

Grounded to the case :wall: I can handle that: I've certainly installed RAM etc before.

 

 

 

I just tap the metal in the case, it works fine. Also, wash your hands with soap or handwash etc, just because you're touching delicate equipment, it's a good idea to have clean hands. Grease isn't particularly good for circuits.

 

 

 

This is my personal way of putting a pc together:

 

motherboard - psu - hard drive and disk drives - RAM - cpu/heatsink - video cards/sounds cards etc - connect it all up

 

 

 

I think that's all the parts, though I've probably missed something. #-o

 

 

 

And pyro: thanks for washing hands and you didn't miss anything.

 

 

 

And should I get a sound card?

 

Hmm, still about the peripherals...

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I think most mobos come with sound cards already in them.

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WONGTONG IS THE BEST AND IS MORE SUPERIOR THAN ME

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Im looking for some No Limit soldiers!

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They'll have a basic integrated one, same with graphics. I think a dedicated graphics card is always a good idea, a sound card isn't as important, unless you want good quality sound, and it always lightens the load on the cpu anyway.

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Would a 20-30 dollar card be worth it at all, just to lighten the load/improve the sound quality. (and recording i suppose)

 

 

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a ... 6829102010

 

 

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a ... 6829102012

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I've got the Creative soundblaster Audigy, it's a fine card, does exactly what I need it to.

 

 

 

The load off from the cpu won't be huge, so unless you can easily afford it, are prepared to pay for it and you will make use of it (i.e. you like to listen to good quality music through nice speakers etc) then it's a good purchase.

 

 

 

The Creative Audigy is a pci card, so make sure you've got a spare pci slot available on the motherboard or you won't be able to use it.

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I've got the Creative soundblaster Audigy, it's a fine card, does exactly what I need it to.

 

 

 

The load off from the cpu won't be huge, so unless you can easily afford it, are prepared to pay for it and you will make use of it (i.e. you like to listen to good quality music through nice speakers etc) then it's a good purchase.

 

 

 

The Creative Audigy is a pci card, so make sure you've got a spare pci slot available on the motherboard or you won't be able to use it.

 

 

 

How does the whole deal with PCI slots work. (how do you tell how many slots you have :P )(I use nice senns to listen to music: It would be worth it IMO)

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