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Danger Will Robinson! (The do's and dont's in computing)

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If your PSU is faulty, don't open it up. Even if its unplugged and everything, the capacitors still have enough charged stored to [bleep] you up. Replace the PSU instead.


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If your PSU is faulty, don't open it up. Even if its unplugged and everything, the capacitors still have enough charged stored to [bleep] you up. Replace the PSU instead.

 

 

 

Same if the fan is bad in the psu too. Always replace a bad psu and don't try to fix it.


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Not sure if it would suit the topic:

 

 

 

Never have your laptop on your lap for a long time, it will yield a terrible ache for some people. Also try not to block the fan with an armrest of your sofa or w/e.


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CPUs

 

 

 

Just be careful whenever you purchase a CPU(central processing unit),and want to replace it on your computer(motherboard),be sensitive and easy on it,replace it carefully,because sometimes it can hit the edges and it will get broken,then it's a wasted CPU.


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CPUs

 

 

 

Just be careful whenever you purchase a CPU(central processing unit),and want to replace it on your computer(motherboard),be sensitive and easy on it,replace it carefully,because sometimes it can hit the edges and it will get broken,then it's a wasted CPU.

 

 

 

To add to that:

 

 

 

Make sure not to bend any of the pins. It will make your processor unusable as well.


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[Ability Bar Suggestion] - [Gaming Enthusiast]

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I've heard a useful tip that if you do bend the pins on a cpu, you can use a pen to correct them. Use those clicky pens that have the retractable nib, then stick it over the pin and wiggle it the right way so it bends the pin back in place.

 

 

 

Not sure if it's a totally reliable/wise thing, but it sounds plausible.


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I've heard a useful tip that if you do bend the pins on a cpu, you can use a pen to correct them. Use those clicky pens that have the retractable nib, then stick it over the pin and wiggle it the right way so it bends the pin back in place.

 

 

 

Not sure if it's a totally reliable/wise thing, but it sounds plausible.

 

 

 

That works but you need to be very careful. You can also slide a credit card through the rows of pins to straighten them up. Both methods could completely break a pin off but if the cpu isn't working to begin with, you can't really break it more :P

 

 

 

I like using a mechanical pencil instead of a pen because the hole is thinner and can get a better grip on the pin.


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mechanical pencil instead of a pen

 

 

 

That reminds me actually, it was a mechanical pencil that the tip said to use, wherever I read it. :P

 

 

 

 

 

Protip from experience:

 

when replacing the heatsink, try not to break the pins that push into the motherboard to secure it

 

cost me £15 to go buy a new one. -.-


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mechanical pencil instead of a pen

 

 

 

That reminds me actually, it was a mechanical pencil that the tip said to use, wherever I read it. :P

 

 

 

 

 

Protip from experience:

 

when replacing the heatsink, try not to break the pins that push into the motherboard to secure it

 

cost me £15 to go buy a new one. -.-

 

 

 

Those can be a pain to take off sometimes, especially on some of the oem boards that are crammed. You do know you need to turn them a half turn before they will unlock? I made that mistake before, always take your time and don't rush through things :lol: .

 

 

 

Another tip when removing a heatsink. If the heatsink is stuck to the processor by dried thermal paste, do not try to use force to separate them. Instaid, gently twist the heatsink back and forth and it will slowly loosen the heatsink from the processor. Or unlock the processor socket before removing the heatsink so the processor comes off with the heatsink so you don't bend any pins.


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It was putting the heatsink back in when I broke the pins lol, I know that you need to turn the screws halfway first etc.

 

 

 

Also, if the thermal paste is a bit stubborn, try running an intensive game or something on your pc for 10 minutes to get the heat up, which can help warm up the paste.


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Never touch an unprotected (as in doesn't have a heatsink on it) processor chip. They get VERY hot very fast.

 

 

 

Trust me...


~~Chaise91~~

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Why was the pc on without a heatsink over the cpu? :|


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I had taken my computer apart. Everything went fine until I went to reinstall the CPU, which was attached to the heat sink. Since I had to put a lot of effort on the heat sink to get in place, I bent the pins on the processor. I fixed those easily with a pocket knife, and then I pried the chip off the heat sink (which had been held on by some heat transfer compound). I placed the CPU in the holder thing without the heat sink thinking that there is no way that thing will get so hot so quickly. I turned my PC on and nothing came up on the monitor, so I thought I'd press down on the processor to make sure it was all the way down. Bad idea. That thing was EXTREMELY hot for being on after such a short amount of time. The compound I mentioned earlier had gotten on my finger, so the heat was held on my left middle finger for even longer, thus giving me a rather annoying blister.


~~Chaise91~~

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I had taken my computer apart. Everything went fine until I went to reinstall the CPU, which was attached to the heat sink. Since I had to put a lot of effort on the heat sink to get in place, I bent the pins on the processor. I fixed those easily with a pocket knife, and then I pried the chip off the heat sink (which had been held on by some heat transfer compound). I placed the CPU in the holder thing without the heat sink thinking that there is no way that thing will get so hot so quickly. I turned my PC on and nothing came up on the monitor, so I thought I'd press down on the processor to make sure it was all the way down. Bad idea. That thing was EXTREMELY hot for being on after such a short amount of time. The compound I mentioned earlier had gotten on my finger, so the heat was held on my left middle finger for even longer, thus giving me a rather annoying blister.

 

 

 

Translated to always run the computer with a heatsink and fan. I'm surprised you didn't fry the chip running without a heatsink for even a second.


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If you're replacing/upgrading something on an already built computer, when you first open the case, remember where all the wires and things go. It saves so much time later on if you're not sure on wire connections and the positions of expansion cards etc.


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DO NOT vaccuum any part of your computer, use a air can.

 

 

 

DO take a shower with your keyboard=-)

 

 

 

If you spill a coke on your laptop, dont worry, pour 10 liters of distilled water on it, then let it fry fo r2-3 weeks

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I use a vacuum cleaner all the time. :D

 

 

 

Well your not suppose to silly =-p

 

 

 

Static Electricity!!!

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I use a vacuum cleaner all the time. :D

 

 

 

Well your not suppose to silly =-p

 

 

 

Static Electricity!!!

 

Depends if it's a special vacuum.

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Nope, just a normal household vacuum.

 

On the outside it's ok. But don't use it while cleaning inside yor computer, if you'd manage to touch a component, chances are it would get fried. Just because you've been fine so far doesn't mean it's gonna be a stroll in the park for ever. I really advice on a can of compressed air.


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Je trouve que ce sont des purs moments de vie

Je ne me reconnais plus dans les gens

Je suis juste un cas désespérant

Et comme personne ne viendra me réclamer

Je terminerai comme un objet retrouvé

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Nope, just a normal household vacuum.

 

On the outside it's ok. But don't use it while cleaning inside yor computer, if you'd manage to touch a component, chances are it would get fried. Just because you've been fine so far doesn't mean it's gonna be a stroll in the park for ever. I really advice on a can of compressed air.

 

 

 

Yea a can of air is like 5 USD (prolyl around 7-8 Euro's) not worth wisking a 500-1000 dollar computer for 5 bucks =-p

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Nope, just a normal household vacuum.

 

On the outside it's ok. But don't use it while cleaning inside yor computer, if you'd manage to touch a component, chances are it would get fried. Just because you've been fine so far doesn't mean it's gonna be a stroll in the park for ever. I really advice on a can of compressed air.

 

Actually we use a vacuum cleaner with a plastic nozzle to clean inside of PCs all the time, nothing wrong with that, I usually use a little brush to dislodge the the dust from fans etc. We also have an air compressor, it totally depends of the situation. One of the best solutions is to use both as you shouldn't be blowing dust into the air, some people suffer from allergies etc.

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Nope, just a normal household vacuum.

 

On the outside it's ok. But don't use it while cleaning inside yor computer, if you'd manage to touch a component, chances are it would get fried. Just because you've been fine so far doesn't mean it's gonna be a stroll in the park for ever. I really advice on a can of compressed air.

 

Actually we use a vacuum cleaner with a plastic nozzle to clean inside of PCs all the time, nothing wrong with that, I usually use a little brush to dislodge the the dust from fans etc. We also have an air compressor, it totally depends of the situation. One of the best solutions is to use both as you shouldn't be blowing dust into the air, some people suffer from allergies etc.

 

Yes, an air compressor would be the ideal thing, but not everyone has it in their house. A can of compressed air will do the trick just as good and is quite alot cheaper. Compressed air works much better in getting away the dust, as a vaccum cleaner is much bigger and you can't really get near in crammed spaces and a greater risk for ESD.

 

And you still have the problem with possibility of water and oil in a normal garage compressor (don't know what type you got). You have the fluid problem on a can too, but it's less of a problem compared to a common compressor.

 

I have a long text about ESD and vaccum cleaners, a guy on a forum (sweclockers) wrote to a professor at Örebro Universitet, called Dag Stranneby, which have classes in ESD and research. But i'm not gonna translate it all, the conclusion is:

 

Rubber-end and plastic end is not to be preferred.

 

The power cord should be attatched if it's grounded.

 

You yourself should be grounded to the computer case.

 

The end of the vaccum cleaner (the "mouth") should be of metal, which should be grounded with a wire.

 

The power button on the PSU should be off.

 

 

 

http://www.sweclockers.com/forum/showth ... did=230416 (down to ESD och Dammsugning vs Tryckluft) feel free to translate with google.

 

 

 

I still maintain that a can of compressed air is the best option.


J'adore aussi le sexe et les snuff movies

Je trouve que ce sont des purs moments de vie

Je ne me reconnais plus dans les gens

Je suis juste un cas désespérant

Et comme personne ne viendra me réclamer

Je terminerai comme un objet retrouvé

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I had taken my computer apart. Everything went fine until I went to reinstall the CPU, which was attached to the heat sink. Since I had to put a lot of effort on the heat sink to get in place, I bent the pins on the processor. I fixed those easily with a pocket knife, and then I pried the chip off the heat sink (which had been held on by some heat transfer compound). I placed the CPU in the holder thing without the heat sink thinking that there is no way that thing will get so hot so quickly. I turned my PC on and nothing came up on the monitor, so I thought I'd press down on the processor to make sure it was all the way down. Bad idea. That thing was EXTREMELY hot for being on after such a short amount of time. The compound I mentioned earlier had gotten on my finger, so the heat was held on my left middle finger for even longer, thus giving me a rather annoying blister.

 

 

 

Translated to always run the computer with a heatsink and fan. I'm surprised you didn't fry the chip running without a heatsink for even a second.

 

 

 

I was also surprised to realized it didn't burn itself out, but I think the heat transfer compound had absorbed a lot of it.


~~Chaise91~~

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