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What is that good about Linux?


fubol

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Hey Hey :)

 

 

 

Yes , i've made some topics lately but that's where this forum is used for :P

 

But now on topic

 

 

 

I hear alot of peaple talking about Linux Ubuntu , but what's that good about it?

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for reading ::'

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No so much Ubuntu directly but linux runs cleaner and you can do so much more with. For the most part everything is free for it and opensource. I think that this topic is going no where productive either. This is just going to turn into a big argument like every other topic on a specific OS.

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One of the big + is that it's free - no cost other than a cd-r. Fast, stable, source-code available... etc etc. There's just tons of stuff that could be mentioned about it as with any other OS.

 

Why not download a *Nix of your choice and run a live-cd (no installation) to get a feeling of it.

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I've used Ubuntu, Debian and Fedora and they're all pretty good. A little impractical for use every day though.

 

 

 

Plus I've found support for wireless network adapters to be dire. All of the drivers are very basic and inspecific unlike ones for Windows; atleast that's what I've seen from Linux anyway.

 

 

 

Fedora is awkward due to no closed-source drivers or anything being included; with Debian you can get them from APT. (Same with Ubuntu).

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Well, if you have a crappy operating system (like my Windows 98SE), you can always dual boot with it. (Unless you have Windows 95/NT or lower) That's the main reason I use it. Not only is the GUI better, but it seems to accept more drivers than my old Windows 98 does.

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Linux. Is. Awesome. I'm typing from Ubuntu Studio right now.

 

 

 

Linux boots in 1/5 the time of Windows, though I've done everything I can to slim the boot. It's fast, it's free, you can use quite a few Windows programs on it through WINE, it's secure and doesn't need a security program at all if you keep the OS up to date, it's entirely customizable, the CLI is very user friendly in comparison to DOS. It manages RAM better than windows, or at least so I've heard. If there's something new that you want for Windows, there's probably an open source version for Linux.

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Can the mods lock this please, it's bound to end in a flame war.

 

 

 

Well , i don't see annybody flaming my tread or Linux , we just discuss it ...

 

If peaple start flaming ,feel free to lock mods

 

 

 

---------

 

One of the big + is that it's free - no cost other than a cd-r. Fast, stable, source-code available... etc etc. There's just tons of stuff that could be mentioned about it as with any other OS.

 

Why not download a *Nix of your choice and run a live-cd (no installation) to get a feeling of it.

 

 

 

So i just download ubuntu from Linux and put it on cd? Then put it in my cd drive?

 

 

 

(Link pl0x )

 

 

 

Thanks for the comments everyone, keep them comming ::'

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I don't think it will turn into a flame war. I think the OP was saying more, "I don't know much about Linux, why is everyone talking about how good it is?" than "Lol Linux sucks, anyone who says that it's better than Windows is stupid.".

 

 

 

EDIT: Let's see, so you downloaded the ISO? Use some CD burning software to burn it to a disk. Next, put it in your drive and restart your computer. Before Windows starts, press F12 until it gives you an option to boot from different devices. Select your CD drive and Ubuntu will boot, I think, or it will give you an option to install. If you have a choice, boot ubuntu and test it out. DO NOT install it unless you know about partitioning and different drive formats and know what you want to do. You would have to think about how much HDD space you want to give Linux.

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I don't think it will turn into a flame war. I think the OP was saying more, "I don't know much about Linux, why is everyone talking about how good it is?" than "Lol Linux sucks, anyone who says that it's better than Windows is stupid.".

 

 

 

EDIT: Let's see, so you downloaded the ISO? Use some CD burning software to burn it to a disk. Next, put it in your drive and restart your computer. Before Windows starts, press F12 until it gives you an option to boot from different devices. Select your CD drive and Ubuntu will boot, I think, or it will give you an option to install. If you have a choice, boot ubuntu and test it out. DO NOT install it unless you know about partitioning and different drive formats and know what you want to do. You would have to think about how much HDD space you want to give Linux.

 

 

 

That seems fair , but when you take out the cd , and restart your computer , everything is normal like it was in xp?

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If you don't install Ubuntu, yes. That's the idea with live CDs, you just bring one to any computer, slide in the CD, boot it, and the OS adjusts itself to the computer in use and you're good to go. It's a good way to get the feel of the OS.

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Linux is not Windows

 

 

 

Therefore, good :thumbsup:

 

 

 

Each distribution of Linux (Linux is really just an OS kernel) really just differs in the software bundled, the different desktops (GNOME or KDE usually), and maybe a few minor other features.

 

 

 

Technically, you could sell distributions (Like Lindows/now Linspire) Lol) since the GPL doesn't say anything against it, just as long as you don't restrict other people from accessing the code. It's just that most distros are free and if you charge anything, people will be reluctant to use it :roll:

 

 

 

The largest drawback is probably lack of compatibility with most of the stuff out there. But with the exception of games, you'll find good substitutes for almost anything. OpenOffice.org is an excellent example of a Linux compatible office suite. Also free.

 

 

 

You'll also have very few threats of viruses:

 

A) If you make a virus to infect every single computer out there running Linux, you're only infecting less than 5% of the entire net.

 

B) Since the code is open source, an army of hungry programmers looking for problems to fix will take any virus and most likely, rewrite the the part of the kernel to fix it.

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The truth about what's so good about Linux and Ubuntu is subjective to the source. I'm an Ubuntu person, but that doesn't mean that it's right for you. What many people seem to believe is good about the OS boils down to two facts:

 

 

 

1) Free (as in freedom) - doesn't cost a thing for you to use it; if you paid for it you'd only pay for support (depending on the distribution you received)

 

2) Less virus-prone - like it was stated earlier, there's a lesser likelihood that you'll become infected with a virus (which doesn't mean you won't be a carrier) because of the lower market share

 

 

 

...and the rest falls subjective.

 

 

 

I can tell you this much -- the reason that I do like Linux is that when something breaks, I can turn off all the fancy stuff and get to the root of the problem. It also runs lighter on my machines, as opposed to Vista (even though this machine came with it in the first place). Lastly, it's fun to give it to relatives, since you can rest assured that if they break it, you can fix it, and if it's broken in the first place, it doesn't take long or much to fix it.

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It all depends on your personal preference. I use it because it's easier on my computer which is very old (using the lightweight xfce environment), just about everything is free, and there's almost literally no security risks. ^_^

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Yep, Linux is about freedom and variety.

 

I've installed and used quite a few different distro's (no where near to a 1/4 of the total distro's out there though..).

 

 

 

Each one has there own twist on what a good OS is about.

 

 

 

I must say Linux is a lot more varied and job specific then Windows will ever be.

 

 

 

Plus you've got to love the price .... FREE

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I'm running Dreamlinux on top of Windows right now so I can use both at once. That's another good thing, Apple won't let you do that with OS X.

 

And Darwin is hard as hell to get to function properly on top of Windows.

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When I was new to Linux, I thought, "what's so good about it" too. So, I tried it out - and I liked it.

 

 

 

Besides the reasons everybody else gave why Linux distributions are good (although I just skimmed over), I like it because:

 

 

 

- Software repositories - just open a terminal, or a GUI frontend if you prefer, and search for basically whatever you want, and get it. Whether you're using a terminal or a GUI frontend, it tends to be much easier to install a bunch of software at the same time than with Windows (really, what's easier, checking a bunch of checkboxes of software to select the software you want - and know is safe, and if it weren't, it wouldn't really matter anyway because Linux is pretty virus-proof - and then clicking "Apply", or searching around Google for each program you want, risking viruses and spyware and having to tediously go through each installer?). Depending on the distribution, the package manager can handle dependencies too, which is another less thing to worry about - if a program on Windows depends on something, the library will often be included with the program, which wastes hard drive space if multiple programs use the library and makes the library harder to upgrade, or you'll have to download it yourself. Upgrading on Linux also tends to be much easier, as applications in the repositories have a standard upgrade procedure which lets you easily choose what you do and don't want to upgrade, without having to go through twenty separate "UPGRADE ME!" boxes on Windows.

 

 

 

- Customizability - distributions of Linux, besides each being different themselves (like Gentoo being well-suited for experienced users who want to control nearly every aspect of their software and make it completely optimal for their systems, and Ubuntu being simpler and much more intuitive), and be further customized to practically whatever you want. With a bunch of window managers and desktop environments to choose from - which are customizable themselves - and a variety of applications to tweak your desktop to your liking, it just totally beats Windows. I do think the Windows Vista and Windows XP themes are decent, and there are some programs to customize them, but Linux distributions are still much better at letting you not only customize the way things look, but the way things work.

 

 

 

- Programming - I love programming on Linux. Windows is decent for programming too, particularly if you're using .NET, which is also by Microsoft, but Linux has so many free useful tools to help you develop your software (ranging from complex integrated development environments like KDevelop to command-line tools like grep to search for/in files or text and ffmpeg to convert practically any audio or video format to another).

 

 

 

There are a few downsides to Linux, but it's often due to things being proprietary (meaning that it isn't really the fault of Linux distributions); for example, it tends to be harder to use proprietary file formats like WMV and proprietary hardware like Nvidia graphics cards. And there are certain popular programs for Windows (that are usually proprietary, so people couldn't even try to modify the source to make it work on Linux if they wanted to) that don't won't on LInux, but many will work with WINE, Cedega, and CrossOver Linux.

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Linux is awesome because using it gives you the right.. no.. the duty, to act like a gigantic DOUCHE to everybody who so much as breathes the same air that has been through the cooling system of a computer that uses an OS that costs money.

 

 

 

Linux is good yes, but for gods sake it isnt a goddam necessity. Its not like Betty Higgins the octogenarian who has had her internet connection forced upon her by her telecom company NEEEEEEEEDS tighter security, faster file transfer speed, access to a massive library of open source software and 10 billion different shades of "elitist grey" to colour her semi transparent icon dock.

 

Why is Linux so underappreciated? Because most people would assume the words command line refer to some sort of military heirarchy and think that the kernel is a guy famous for his fried chicken.

 

"Do you often use word to type up documents Mr. [puncture]ingsworth? "

 

"NO! I'm not a corporate tool like you! I use Openoffice 3.000010293 Alpha build!"

 

Buying windows machines does not make you a Bill Gates' personal gimp, its the bloody industry standard. Millions upon millions of people use it because its tried and tested GOOD, and they can do without a buggy as hell distro that has a raft of built in features that tell them exactly how long, on a scale of one to hipster, they need to spend flaunting their screwbuntu hackintosh laptop in starbucks each day.

 

 

 

er.. I went off on a tangent there.. poncey linux users get on my nerves.

 

 

 

Linux - A damn good OS for servers and PC professionals

 

Windows - The rest of us WONT NOTICE THE DIFFERENCE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(this wasnt aimed at anybody in here.. more at the entire userbase of Digg, slashdot and reddit.)

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Linux is awesome because using it gives you the right.. no.. the duty, to act like a gigantic DOUCHE to everybody who so much as breathes the same air that has been through the cooling system of a computer that uses an OS that costs money.
Yeah, some people can be kind of zealous about it. And even within Linux users, many people are fanatic about a particular distribution or desktop environment.

 

 

 

 

Linux is good yes, but for gods sake it isnt a goddam necessity. Its not like Betty Higgins the octogenarian who has had her internet connection forced upon her by her telecom company NEEEEEEEEDS tighter security, faster file transfer speed, access to a massive library of open source software and 10 billion different shades of "elitist grey" to colour her semi transparent icon dock.

 

Yeah, for the average computer user, Windows is probably fine or better than Linux, mostly because of its popularity (people in general are more familiar with it, so other WIndows users like friends and family can help out with problems, etc.) and compatibility issues.

 

 

 

 

Why is Linux so underappreciated? Because most people would assume the words command line refer to some sort of military heirarchy and think that the kernel is a guy famous for his fried chicken.

 

Something along those lines, and like you also mentioned, it's pretty much the "industry standard."
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I agree with what Jaziek said, on most stuff. There are some people that are that radical, but maybe not as many as you made out. And terminals aren't scary, it doesn't take long to learn and anyway, the commands make sense if you think about them.

 

 

 

Also, I agree totally with bfr. Linux is one of the great undiscovered OSes.

 

 

 

Speaking of that, has anyone here heard of Darwin? And I don't mean the awards. It's something very unknown even though maybe >5% of all computer users use it regularly. Right now I'm working on installing it on top of Windows.

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Darwin- not at all....

 

 

 

And I've been considering dual booting with linux, but what I really want to know is how compatible are games with it? Because if I have to reboot just for that one game, etc, then it definitely isn't worth it....

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"How compatible are games with it [Linux]?"

 

 

 

Short Answer: Very Incompatible

 

 

 

Longer Answer With a Question: What games are you intending to run? Most of the larger mainstream games like Crysis, Half-Life 2 and other Source-based games, etc tend to not bother with making their games compatible with Linux.

 

 

 

Longer Answer which branches off of the previous one: However, it's not like Linux is entirely without games. Where Micro$oft and pretty much everything that's developed for it is pretty much giant corporate money-making gnarly machine, Linux is the awesome, fun-loving, laid-back, fuzzy and cute edged open-source project that's ushered on and developed by a large generous community (The logo for Linux is Tux, the awesome penguin. The Windows logo is...well...a window :roll: )

 

 

 

In the same spirit as the people who develop the kernel, people also makes games for Linux, although not as visually-wowing.

 

 

 

And as already mentioned, there are a few programs which emulate Windows on Linux, but they only go so far.

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