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32 bit or 64 bit?


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Right now I'm sitting on a laptop with 2GB of RAM, a dual-core AMD processor, and a 64-bit distribution of Ubuntu Jaunty. Ever since 64-bit OSes went mainstream, there's been a lot of hesitation and fear about moving over to one, but I could say that most of these fears are rather unfounded.

 

 

 

I'm curious if anyone else here actually runs a 64-bit system, or if they've been considering it. There are a few more perks to running a 64-bit system than 2^64 bytes of addressable memory, you know. ;) Many of the newer OSes, such as Vista and OS X/Leopard either are or have 64-bit variants already, and given the right push towards larger memory requirements, we'll have no real choice in the end.

 

[it'd be nice to get a 128-bit system going soon...but we'd never be able to use all of that memory anyway.]

 

 

 

So let's get a good discussion going. Do you use a 32 or 64 bit OS? Why would you use one over the other? I'll get the ball rolling.

 

 

 

I have a tower as well as a laptop which happens to have 4GB of RAM installed, but it runs both 32-bit variants of XP and Ubuntu Intrepid. Why aren't I using 64-bit at least with Linux? There has been some difficulty in getting most of what I tinker with on a daily basis to work reliably under a 64-bit system, such as RS fullscreen, DVD playback, in many cases, and what I feel is a more bloated program experience. (I understand that a 64-bit program will use more memory than a 32-bit program, but still...) I do like the idea of using 64-bit systems, so I put that on my laptop to give it a whirl. A few of the nuisances are going away, and I'm slowly learning my way around the system...but that doesn't justify a full conversion to 64-bit just yet for me.

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My laptop uses Vista 64, with 4GB of DDR3 ram.

 

 

 

I like the OS. Very stable and support for both 32 bit and 64 bit is perfect. The fear of your applications not working in a 64 bit OS is something of the past. :P

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I use a 32bit Windows XP Home Edition, because it came bundled with the PC. I would upgrade to 64bit (which I should do, since I'm only utilising 3.5GB out of 4GB of RAM). When I feel the urge to upgrade my PC, I'll be getting Vista 64bit.

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Two years ago I was a failure and got a 32bit. So for one year I was kind of depressed about it.

 

 

 

Then the idea hit me; Hey I could just change to 64bit with minimal hassle.

 

 

 

But yea, 64bit these days is much more worth it than 32bit, and since I have 10 tabs in Firefox, and 20 tabs in Chrome open all the time, and like things like resource hogs like xfire or a game (or two), the extra memory (6GB) is mandatory, and when I make a new build in 1 or 2 years I'm going to have to get at least 8gb of RAM, maybe more depending on how cheap DDR3 becomes then, or if we're using our SSD's for RAM in those days, lols.

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32 bit xp. I really dislike vista so I don't know what I'll do once I need a new computer :?

 

 

 

Install XP on it, of course! There's a 64 bit version of XP too ;)

 

Yep, but since XP 64 was made for the businesses, it has [cabbage] loads of compatibility problems.

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32 bit xp. I really dislike vista so I don't know what I'll do once I need a new computer :?

 

 

 

Install XP on it, of course! There's a 64 bit version of XP too ;)

 

Yep, but since XP 64 was made for the businesses, it has [cabbage] loads of compatibility problems.

 

 

 

Including problems with Photoshop CS4 using GPU processing.

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32 bit xp. I really dislike vista so I don't know what I'll do once I need a new computer :?

 

 

 

Install XP on it, of course! There's a 64 bit version of XP too ;)

 

Yep, but since XP 64 was made for the businesses, it has [cabbage] loads of compatibility problems.

 

 

 

Oh, sorry, didn't know that... :oops:

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32 bit xp. I really dislike vista so I don't know what I'll do once I need a new computer :?

 

 

 

Install XP on it, of course! There's a 64 bit version of XP too ;)

 

 

 

Suggesting XP64 because you dislike vista is the funniest thing I've ever heard.

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I personally don't like Vista, but if I had to upgrade to a Windows OS, I'd wait until Windows 7 hit the shelves.

 

 

 

I'm actually considering upgrading my system to use full 64-bit OSes, starting around November (Karmic is set to release around that time). Many of the problems I used to have, such as drivers not working right, or a few devices failing sporadically, are starting to become things of the past.

 

 

 

I'm curious as to if anyone here has done any actual benchmarking with a 64-bit system. If you're the type of guy to bring your system to your knees, what did you do and what did you use under a 32/64 bit environment? This also segways into if anyone's noticed any performance improvements (stalls or hiccups) when shifting platforms, too.

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If I were to move over to a 64-bit OS, I think I'd probably need/want to get a new computer.

 

 

 

My desktop is basicly an old (at least 5 years by now) machine from my grandparents' office that I "beefed up" (for lack of a better term) with parts from other old machines from my grandparents' office (it was all free and it's actually a very reliable machine, so I can't complain :mrgreen: ).

 

 

 

I also have a 2-year-old laptop that's curently running 32-bit Vista and the only problem I've had with it was that it only had 512 mb of RAM when I first got it (a few months before Vista came out; I got the free Vista upgrade deal) and I quickly found that that wasn't nearly enough and had it upgraded to 2 gb RAM shortly after. I guess I might be able to put a 64-bit OS on it, but I don't do anything on it except use the internet and play music and videos, so there's really no point in it (also note that it only has a 14-inch widescreen, so multi-tasking on it doesn't work all that well).

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Eh, I had 64-bit Vista with that Dell. It ended up being the reason I nearly sued them; bad drivers. Until Microsoft makes the transition easier and more fluid, I won't buy another 64-bit Windows product. At the present, I am running 64-bit OS X.

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Heh, was quite easy for me to upgrade to 64bit. I first had xp on the computer, but crashed and had all sorts of bugs, even with it to date and all the drivers. I then moved to Vista 32bit, which was already faster and more stable than xp without Sp1, but got the service pack the next day. I'm now on Vista 64bit, and it goes much faster than it did on 32bit. Hp did not have 64bit drivers for my computer, but I still managed to get some.

 

 

 

I know I wasted a bit of money on this, but I hope I can put that 64bit Vista on my next computer build next year.

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32 bit xp. I really dislike vista so I don't know what I'll do once I need a new computer :?

 

 

 

Install XP on it, of course! There's a 64 bit version of XP too ;)

 

 

 

Suggesting XP64 because you dislike vista is the funniest thing I've ever heard.

 

I agree, I don't think much of the 64 bit version. I might just go with linux, or just keep installing XP 32 bit ;)

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I know I wasted a bit of money on this, but I hope I can put that 64bit Vista on my next computer build next year.

 

Screw Vista, and go Windows 7.

 

 

 

You can even torrent the latest version of the RC for Windows 7 and have a free O/S till January or February, or until it's commercially sold.

 

 

 

:)

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I'm running a 32bit OSX Leopard on this iMac, though I may consider upgrading to 64 Bit Snow Leopard when it is released.

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I know I wasted a bit of money on this, but I hope I can put that 64bit Vista on my next computer build next year.

 

Screw Vista, and go Windows 7.

 

 

 

You can even torrent the latest version of the RC for Windows 7 and have a free O/S till January or February, or until it's commercially sold.

 

 

 

:)

 

I do have Windows 7 RC, but I was saying that in the way that I wouldn't need to waste such money. Anyway, on my current computer, Vista 64bit is faster than W7 64bit for some reason.

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I'm running a 32bit OSX Leopard on this iMac, though I may consider upgrading to 64 Bit Snow Leopard when it is released.
OS X Leopard is 64 bit already. Some applications are not 64 bit, such as mail. Snow Leopard rewrites Carbon into Cocoa, further expounding the 64 bit kernel. All of the applications then will be 64 bit compatible alongside Open CL. Though, I don't believe your iMac is capable of the latter. Today at WWDC, they updated the MacBook Pros (adding the 13" unibody MacBook to it as well), released the iPhone 3GS, showed the iPhone OS 3.00 platform, and gave a release date to Snow Leopard which will be made available to all Leopard users in September for $29. But yes, 10.5.xx Leopard is 64-bit; that's how they get 32GB of RAM into the Mac Pro. Next will be 16TB. :P
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What I've noticed about 64-bit OSes is that they retain some sort of middle-ground 48-bit compatibility mode, just in case. Are you telling me that Snow Leopard is fully 64-bit? That'd be interesting to see.

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What I've noticed about 64-bit OSes is that they retain some sort of middle-ground 48-bit compatibility mode, just in case. Are you telling me that Snow Leopard is fully 64-bit? That'd be interesting to see.
From what we currently know, yes. I tried out the developer's beta and some of the applications still aren't coded in Cocoa or x64 but it's shaping up that way. But yeah, that's why Apple is dropping PowerPC support, because the majority of the CPUs can't handle it.

 

 

 

It might be different because Windows sells OEMs while Apple still maintains a closed market. Which would seemingly make the transition better.

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I've been using 100% 64bit os's for quite a while. I'm currently using the windows 7 RC, and Opensuse 11.1 on my server. I haven't had any problems with 64bit for the past year or so. (though for some reason the windows 7 beta (7000) was faster than the RC (7100) )

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